154
154
Hans Hofmann
SUSPENDED SHAPES
Stima
200.000300.000
Lotto. Venduto 332,500 USD (Prezzo di aggiudicazione con commissione d'acquisto)
VAI AL LOTTO
154
Hans Hofmann
SUSPENDED SHAPES
Stima
200.000300.000
Lotto. Venduto 332,500 USD (Prezzo di aggiudicazione con commissione d'acquisto)
VAI AL LOTTO

Details & Cataloguing

Contemporary Art

|
New York

Hans Hofmann
1880 - 1966
SUSPENDED SHAPES

Provenienza(e)

André Emmerich Gallery, New York
Acquired by the present owner from the above in 1987

Esposizione

New York, André Emmerich Gallery, Hans Hofmann, The Push and Pull of Cubism, December 1987 - January 1989, pl. 1, illustrated in color

Nota a catalogo

This work will be included in the forthcoming Hans Hofmann Catalogue Raisonné, sponsored by the Renate, Hans and Maria Hofmann Trust.

Hans Hofmann began 1949, the year this work was painted, with a triumphal return to Paris to attend the opening of the exhibition of his works at the Galerie Maeght, which was organized by his dealer in New York, Kootz Gallery.  It was his first visit to Paris since his return to Munich in 1914.  Rediscovering Paris after an absence of some 35 years, Hofmann spent much time visiting the ateliers of old friends, including Picasso, Matisse and Brancusi.  He thus reconnected with the Parisian school of Cubism which had dominated the art scene prior to World War I. Hofmann's own works from the period show a renewed interest in Cubist principles. This was noted by André Emmerich in his introduction to the exhibition catalogue 'Hans Hofmann, The Push and Pull of Cubism'  which opened late in 1987, and in which Suspended Shapes was included:

"`Push and Pull' was an axiomatic phrase frequently used by Hofmann in his classes and theoretical writings.  It refers to the way 'cool' colors will appear to recede from the surface while 'hot' colors will advance, and also suggest movement.  Suspended Shapes is an excellent demonstration of this theory.  That his own pictures should exemplify his teaching explains why his students respected him so much – and why there were so many of them, and so many who went on to contribute to the Abstract Expressionist movement in America."

Contemporary Art

|
New York