790
790
Comrie, Leslie John (1893-1950)
A COLLECTION OF 4 WORKS RELATING TO CALCULATING MACHINES, COMPRISING:
Estimation
400600
ACCÉDER AU LOT
790
Comrie, Leslie John (1893-1950)
A COLLECTION OF 4 WORKS RELATING TO CALCULATING MACHINES, COMPRISING:
Estimation
400600
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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Londres

Comrie, Leslie John (1893-1950)
A COLLECTION OF 4 WORKS RELATING TO CALCULATING MACHINES, COMPRISING:
i. Calculating machines... Being appendix III to L. R. Connor's Statistics in Theory and Practice. London: Pitman, 1938, offprint, original pale blue wrappers, (bought from Graham Weiner, London, 1984), [T&W C139; Randell 1979 p.120]
ii. Computing by calculating machines. London: Gee & Co. 1927, offprint from The Accountant's Journal, vol. 45, p.42 (May 1927), slip of H.M. Nautical Almanac Office letterpaper signed by Comrie loosely inserted (consigning the pamphlet to an unknown recipient, dated August 28, 1928), original wrappers, (bought from Weiner, 1984), [T&W C143; Origins of Cyberspace 256; Randell 1979 p.119], slight tear on upper wrapper with loss, wrappers slightly soiled
iii. Inverse interpolation and scientific applications of the National Accounting Machine. London: Royal Statistical Society, printed for private circulation, 1936, offprint, reprinted from the Supplement to the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, vol. 3, no. 2, May 1936, pp.87-114, original pale blue printed wrappers, (bought from Interlibrum, Vaduz, 1993), [T&W C149; Origins of Cyberspace 270; Randell 1979 p.120]
iv. Scientific computing service. London: 1937, printed by the author, original wrappers, [T&W C157; Origins of Cyberspace 273]
8vo
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Description

Important offprints by the foremost computer and table maker between the two world wars. The third paper describes the National Computing Machine, a machine with several internal registers which Comrie used in computing tables.

"...The machine to be described may be called a modern Babbage machine: it does all that Babbage intended his difference to do and more. At a cost of £500-600, it is not beyond the means of institutions where extensive computing is undertaken..."

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

|
Londres