362
362
Leybourn, William (1626-1716)
THE LINE OF PROPORTION OR NUMBERS, COMMONLY CALLED GUNTER'S LINE MADE EASIE: BY THE WHICH MAY BE MEASURED ALL MANNER OF SUPERFICES AND SOLIDS; AS BOARD, GLASS, PAVEMENT, TIMBER, STONE, &C. LONDON: PRINTED BY J[OHN] M[AYCOCK] FOR G[EORGE] SAWBRIDGE, 1678
Estimation
1 2001 800
Lot. Vendu 2,000 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
362
Leybourn, William (1626-1716)
THE LINE OF PROPORTION OR NUMBERS, COMMONLY CALLED GUNTER'S LINE MADE EASIE: BY THE WHICH MAY BE MEASURED ALL MANNER OF SUPERFICES AND SOLIDS; AS BOARD, GLASS, PAVEMENT, TIMBER, STONE, &C. LONDON: PRINTED BY J[OHN] M[AYCOCK] FOR G[EORGE] SAWBRIDGE, 1678
Estimation
1 2001 800
Lot. Vendu 2,000 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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Leybourn, William (1626-1716)
THE LINE OF PROPORTION OR NUMBERS, COMMONLY CALLED GUNTER'S LINE MADE EASIE: BY THE WHICH MAY BE MEASURED ALL MANNER OF SUPERFICES AND SOLIDS; AS BOARD, GLASS, PAVEMENT, TIMBER, STONE, &C. LONDON: PRINTED BY J[OHN] M[AYCOCK] FOR G[EORGE] SAWBRIDGE, 1678
FIRST EDITION, 12mo (122 x 73mm.), folding engraved plate, contemporary calf, spine lettered in gilt horizontally, old library label at foot of spine, modern folding cloth box
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Provenance

William Constable, FRS (1721-1791), bookplate; [Harrison Horblit (1912-1988)]; bought from H.P. Kraus, New York, 1985, Catalogue 169: The History of Science including Navigation... from the Library of Harrison D. Horblit (1985), item 66 ($1250)

Bibliographie

Tomash & Williams L100; ESTC R31559; Harris 503; Hoock & Jeannin II/L31.12; Wing L1920

Description

This is a theoretical guide to a logarithmic rule based on the work of Edmund Gunter, a professor at Gresham College.

“This Treatise may be beneficial and usefull… to Gentlemen, and others, who at this time may have more than ordinary occasion to make use thereof, in the Rebuilding of the Renowned City of London” (From “To the Reader”).

The Erwin Tomash Library on the History of Computing

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Londres