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Details & Cataloguing

English Literature & History

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[Yeats, W.B.]--Boughton, Alice
PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPH OF YEATS
Platinum print, 227 by 179mm., signed by the photographer (“Copyrighted by | Alice Boughton Apr. 1904 New York”) in lower left and signed by W.B. Yeats (“WBYeats | To Mrs Pope | Hennessy”) in lower right, mounted on card, some minor spotting and surface marks
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Description

Alice Boughton (1876-1945) in Photographing the Famous (New York, 1928) wrote “William B. Yeats... was twice photographed by me... He looked the part of the poet with flowing tie and the long lock of hair over the forehead. He seemed shy and diffident, and I found it somewhat difficult to hold his attention. Once Jack Yeats... came into the studio, and when he saw a picture of William I had done, he said, ‘Oh, yes, I know that look of Willie's - when one says “Mr. Yeats will you have pudding or pie,” and he really doesn't care which.’”

John Quinn had arranged for Yeats to be photographed probably on 22 December 1903 and wrote to the photographer on 7 January 1904 stating that “Yeats received the three photographs which you sent him and was charmed by them”. Boughton’s images of Yeats were published in New York Herald on 17 January 1904 and Gaelic American on 5 March 1904.

Una Pope-Hennessy (1876-1945) was the eldest daughter of Sir Arthur Birch. Both she and her family were close friends of Lady Gregory. In 1910 she married Ladislaus Pope-Hennessy. In Spring 1905 she contributed to Masefield’s appeal to ‘friends of Mr. W.B. Yeats and appreciators of his work’ to contribute £1 towards the purchase of a Kelmscott Chaucer for the poet’s birthday. One year later Una Birch was described by Yeats to Lilly Yeats as one of three “really rich people I know sufficiently well [in London]” (a London exhibition of Dun Emer work was planned and Lilly Yeats was evidently seeking potential buyers). Correspondence survives between Yeats and Una Pope-Hennessy dating from 1910, 1911, 1912, 1921 and 1932. We can assume, therefore, that Yeats presented this to the recipient in the period 1910-1912.

English Literature & History

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Londres