160
160
David Hockney
STUDY OF L.A., PARIS
Estimation
100 000150 000
Lot. Vendu 77,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
160
David Hockney
STUDY OF L.A., PARIS
Estimation
100 000150 000
Lot. Vendu 77,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Contemporary Art Day Auction

|
New York

David Hockney
B. 1937
STUDY OF L.A., PARIS
signed with the artist's initials and dated 75
colored pencil and graphite on paper
25 by 19 3/4 in. 63.5 by 50.2 cm.
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Provenance

Private Collection, New York (acquired directly from the artist)
Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2011

Exposition

New York, Paul Kasmin Gallery, David Hockney: Early Drawings, November - December 2015
St. Moritz, Robilant + Voena, Cabinet Room: David Hockney, August - September 2017

Description

Defined by its delicate coloring and technical mastery of line, this tender portrait is an exquisite example of the intimate series of colored pencil and crayon drawings David Hockney produced of his closest friends and family while living in Paris in the early 1970s. As Paul Melia has explained: “Indeed this series of portrait drawings provides evidence of Hockney’s attempt to re-orientate his practice as an artist, to establish a sense of contact with the work of individual past ‘masters’ and with the European tradition” (“The Drawings of David Hockney” in Exh. Cat., London, Royal Academy of Arts (and traveling), David Hockney, A Drawing Retrospective, 1996, p. 22). Hockney was introduced to the sitter, Linda Abrams, by the distinguished British art dealer and collector John Kasmin. This drawing encapsulates the distinctive naturalism and growing sensitivity that characterizes Hockney’s work of this period.

Hockney’s Paris drawings illustrate the influence of a century of French art, as Ingres, Degas, Toulouse-Lautrec, Matisse and Balthus are all evoked by these portraits. The present work, executed in a studio that had once belonged to Balthus, takes particular inspiration from that enigmatic modern artist: one of Hockney’s rare female nudes, the depiction is at once academically technical and intimately sensual. Classically posed, adroitly translated, and fully rendered, Study of L.A., Paris is a work of consummate draughtsmanship that belongs to the highest tier of portraits by the artist.

Contemporary Art Day Auction

|
New York