1231
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Details & Cataloguing

The History of Now: The Important American Folk Art Collection of David Teiger | Sold to Benefit Teiger Foundation for the Support of Contemporary Art

|
New York

Cotswold Ewe
Probably By L.W. Cushing & Sons
1865-1933

molded and repousse copper weathervane
Height 18 in. by Length 24 3/4 in.
circa 1880
Waltham, Massachusetts
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Provenance

Giampietro American Art and Antiques, New Haven, Connecticut.

Bibliographie

Myrna Kaye, Yankee Weathervanes, (New York: E.P. Dutton, 1975) p. 114;
Steve Miller, The Art of the Weathervane (Atglen, Pennsylvania: Schiffer Publishing, 1984) p. 113;
Tom Geismar and Harvey Kahn, Spiritually Moving: A Collection of American Folk Art Sculpture (New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1998) cat. no. 29, illus. in color.

Description

Soon after Stillman White, Leonard Cushing's original business partner, sold his share of the company to him in 1873, Cushing brought his two sons into the firm and gave it the name it would operate under until it closed its doors in 1933. The company, which had begun in 1867 when Cushing and White purchased the recently deceased A.L. Jewell's inventory and molds, became one of the most successful and long-lived of all weathervane-manufacturing enterprises. 

Cotswold sheep, named after the Cotswold hills of southwestern England where they had become established by the 1500s, are "gentle giants" believed to have descended from long-wool sheep brought to Britain by the Romans. The breed was introduced in the United States in 1831 and had become the country's most popular domestic sheep by the time Cushing & White began making vanes.

The History of Now: The Important American Folk Art Collection of David Teiger | Sold to Benefit Teiger Foundation for the Support of Contemporary Art

|
New York