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Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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New York

A VERY RARE DIMINUTIVE WILLIAM AND MARY TURNED AND JOINED MAPLE TABLE, RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1725
top replaced.
Height 22 3/4 in. by Width 26 1/8 in. by Depth 15 3/8 in.; 57.8 by 66.3 by 39 cm.
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Provenance

William E. Taylor, North Attleborough, Massachusetts, September 2003;
Vogel Collection no. 728.

Exposition

Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, Art & Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, August 19, 2016-January 8, 2017.

Bibliographie

Erik Kyle Gronning and Dennis Andrew Carr, “Early Rhode Island Turning,” American Furniture 2005, ed. Luke Beckerdite, (Milwaukee, WI: Chipstone Foundation, 2005), p. 13, 15, fig. 31;
Patricia Kane, et. al., Art & Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650-1830, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016), pp. 178-9, no. 17;
Rhode Island Furniture Archive no.: RIF5110. 

Description

The asymmetrical character of this table's turning represents a regional preference in the Rhode Island area that differs from the more common symmetrical baluster turnings found on gateleg tables and smaller tables and stools made elsewhere in New England, especially in  eastern Massachusetts. Scholars have placed the different variations of Rhode Island turnings into separate groups.  This table’s turnings are stylistically slightly dissimilar from those associated to group three.  What is important to note is the dramatic built-in rake of the legs.  Nearly all Rhode Island tables made at this time are crafted with this rake to the legs.  Typically it is one dimension as seen in the currently offered lot.  For additional information on early Baroque Rhode Island turnings see Erik Kyle Gronning and Dennis Andrew Carr, “Early Rhode Island Turning,” American Furniture 2005, ed. Luke Beckerdite, (Milwaukee, WI: Chipstone Foundation, 2005), pp. 2-21.

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York