1016
1016

PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK PRIVATE COLLECTOR

A RARE GLAZED BISCUIT FIGURE OF LIU HAI
QING DYNASTY, KANGXI PERIOD
Estimation
8 00012 000
Lot. Vendu 8,125 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
1016

PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK PRIVATE COLLECTOR

A RARE GLAZED BISCUIT FIGURE OF LIU HAI
QING DYNASTY, KANGXI PERIOD
Estimation
8 00012 000
Lot. Vendu 8,125 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Saturday at Sotheby's: Asian Art

|
New York

A RARE GLAZED BISCUIT FIGURE OF LIU HAI
QING DYNASTY, KANGXI PERIOD
the immortal seated in a posture of ease holding a peach in the right hand, with the left foot resting on the head of a toad, dressed in a robe painted with a 'cracked ice and prunus' design, the well-modeled expressive face below a circlet keeping the long, loose hair in place, the back unglazed and centered with a circular aperture, with a twelve-character dedicatory inscription, supported on a wood stand carved with clouds, emblems of the eight Daoist immortals and other auspicious symbols (2)
Height 13 1/4  in., 33.6 cm
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

Collection of Espirito Santo.
Acquired in Portugal, 1974.

Description

The inscription may be translated as 'Devotee Hong Wuhao of Duchang county offers this image with joy'. Duchang is located in Jiangxi province.

The facial features, especially the eyes and nose, of this figure, as well as the wood stand, are closely related to a Kangxi period figure sold at Christie's New York, 24th March 2011, lot 1720. 

Two other glazed biscuit Daoist deities portraying the civilian and military gods of wealth supported on similar bases, from the collection of John D. Rockefeller Jr., and now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, are illustrated in Suzanne G. Valenstein, A Handbook of Chinese Ceramics, New York, 1989, col. pl. 33, and p. 228, no. 222 respectively. 

Liu Hai is venerated as a god of wealth because his companion toad is particularly attracted to gold. If the toad ever strayed, Liu Hai could lure him out of hiding by using a string of coins.  Since ancient Chinese coins had a hole in the middle and Liu Hai would thread them together through the hole, he is also venerated as the patron saint of needle makers.

In the present lot, Liu Hai is portrayed holding a peach, thereby not only bestowing wealth, but also longevity.

Saturday at Sotheby's: Asian Art

|
New York