36
36
Roelandt Savery
A LION HUNTING TWO DEER
Estimation
60 00080 000
Lot. Vendu 62,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
36
Roelandt Savery
A LION HUNTING TWO DEER
Estimation
60 00080 000
Lot. Vendu 62,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Master Paintings: Part I

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New York

Roelandt Savery
KORTRIJK 1576 - 1639 UTRECHT
A LION HUNTING TWO DEER
signed lower center: ROELANT/SAVERY and inscribed with an old inventory number lower right: R.F. 156.
oil on panel, circular
diameter: 24 3/4  in.; 63 cm.
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Provenance

Gräflich Harrach'sche Gemäldegalerie, Vienna, Rohrauer Fideikommis, inv.no. 156.

Bibliographie

K. Erasmus, Roelant Savery, dissertation, Halle 1908, p. 122, cat. no. 145;
H. Ritschl, Katalog der Erlaucht Gräflich Harrachschen Gemälde-Galerie in Wien, Vienna 1926, p. 43, cat. no. 391;
K.J. Müllenmeister, Roelant Savery, Die Gemälde mit Kritischem Oeuvrekatalog, Freren 1988, p. 258, cat.no.131, reproduced plate 22 (as circa 1620, perhaps with the assistance of Hans Savery II).

Description

This painting is a late work by Savery, dated by Kurt J. Müllenmeister to circa 1620 (see Literature).  By that date, Savery had returned to the Netherlands from Prague, where he had been in the service of Emperor Rudolph II from around 1603-1613.  While there, the artist made numerous detailed studies of animals and birds in the menageries and hunting grounds of Rudolph and continued to use these as reference for later paintings.  Rudolph had sent Savery on an expedition to the Tyrol in circa 1606-07 where he made drawings of mountains and waterfalls that also served as inspiration in his landscapes.

In Utrecht, where he settled after 1619, Savery found a steady demand for his landscapes among a large and prosperous class of buyers who were fascinated by his fantastical scenes and wild animals.  This painting, depicting a lion chasing two deer through a dramatic mountainous ravine with a cascade in the background, would have been highly exotic compared to the more realistic landscapes being produced by Savery’s Dutch contemporaries.

Master Paintings: Part I

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New York