49
49

PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN COLLECTION

A village rug, probably Anatolia
Estimation
8 00012 000
Lot. Vendu 9,375 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
49

PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN COLLECTION

A village rug, probably Anatolia
Estimation
8 00012 000
Lot. Vendu 9,375 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Carpets and Textiles from Distinguished Collections

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New York

A village rug, probably Anatolia

Description

This intriguing piece combines design elements found in Anatolian rugs with those more typical of Caucasian and Persian weavings.  The generous border employs cartouche with interior tracery reminiscent of early West Anatolian rugs, see H. Kirchheim, et al, Orient Stars, London and Stuttgart 1993, pl. 161, or the pendent medallions on a 16th century Persian carpet, see Jon Thompson, Milestones in the History of Carpets, Milan 2006, fig. 165; and flatwoven Safavid rugs such as A.U. Pope, A Survey of Persian Art, Oxford, 1936, pl. 1263.  The ton-sur-ton vinery in the border is found on Karapinar rugs as well as an early East Anatolian carpet in the Vakiflar Museum, Istanbul, see B. Balpinar and U. Hirsch, Carpets, Wesel 1998, pl. 26.  The reciprocal diamond guard borders are featured on numerous weavings from the Caucasus from the 18th century on, for two examples, see C.G. Ellis, Early Caucasian Rugs, Washington, D.C. 1975, pls. 20 and 30.  To add to the puzzle, there is an open narrow indigo outer surrounding border that is more typical of Northwest Persian weavings.   The three medallion field design is spacious and employs motifs such as stylized palmettes that are shared across the rug belt.  It seems that the weaver of this rug was familiar with workshop produced carpets and here assimilated some of their motifs in an individual and possibly unique way.

Carpets and Textiles from Distinguished Collections

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New York