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PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, EUROPE

Alberto Giacometti
BUSTE D'HOMME SUR SOCLE 
Estimation
500 000700 000
Lot. Vendu 821,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
162

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, EUROPE

Alberto Giacometti
BUSTE D'HOMME SUR SOCLE 
Estimation
500 000700 000
Lot. Vendu 821,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Alberto Giacometti
1901 - 1966
BUSTE D'HOMME SUR SOCLE 
Inscribed Alberto Giacometti, numbered 5/8 and inscribed with the foundry mark Susse Fondeur Paris; stamped with the foundry mark Susse Fondeur Paris Cire Perdue (on the interior) 
Bronze 
Height: 21 3/8 in.
54.3 cm
Conceived circa 1947 and cast posthumously in edition of 8; this example cast in 1990. 
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Provenance

Annette Giacometti (and sold: Christie's, Paris, September 28, 2002, lot 8)
Private Collection (acquired at the above sale)
Acquired from the above in 2009

Bibliographie

Alberto Giacometti: A Loan Exhibition (exhibition catalogue), Acquavella Galleries, New York, 1994, illustration of another cast p. 60

Description

Buste d'homme sur socle, a powerfully attenuated and richly textured bust, is a reflection of the duality in Giacometti's oeuvre during the late 1940s and early 1950s. On the one hand, there is the increasing emphasis on the reduction of the human figure, which was honed down to an essence to correspond to the artist's vision of reality; on the other, there is the creation of surfaces that inflect and manipulate the play of light upon them.

A visit to the cinema during this period had changed the way Giacometti viewed the world and his art. He commented: "I began to see heads in the void, in the space which surrounds them. When for the first time I clearly perceived how a head I was looking at could become fixed, immobilized definitively in time, I trembled with terror as never before in my life and a cold sweat ran down my back. It was no longer a living head, but an object I was looking at like any other object, but no, differently, not like any other object but like something simultaneously living and dead. I gave a cry of terror as if I had just crossed a threshold, as if I was entering a world never seen before" (quoted in James Lord, Giacometti, A Biography, London, 1986, p. 258).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York