158
158

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, EUROPE

Pablo Picasso
NATURE MORTE AUX VERRES
Estimation
600 000800 000
Lot. Vendu 893,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
158

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION, EUROPE

Pablo Picasso
NATURE MORTE AUX VERRES
Estimation
600 000800 000
Lot. Vendu 893,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Pablo Picasso
1881 - 1973
NATURE MORTE AUX VERRES
Signed Picasso (upper left)
Oil on canvas
10 5/8 by 16 in.
27 by 40.6 cm
Painted on December 12, 1943.
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Provenance

Mr. & Mrs. S.M. McAshan, Jr., Houston (acquired by 1944)
Private Collection, Texas (by descent from the above and sold: Christie's, New York, November 4, 2010, lot 349)
Acquired at the above sale

Exposition

Houston, Contemporary Arts Museum, Picasso Exhibit, 1955, no. 26 (titled The Crystals and dated 1944)
Houston, Museum of Fine Arts, From Gauguin to Gorky in Cullinan Hall, 1960, no. 54 (dated circa 1940)
Houston, Contemporary Arts Museum, Finders/Keepers, 1997, illustrated in the catalogue (dated circa 1940)

Bibliographie

Christian Zervos, Pablo Picasso, Oeuvres de 1943 et 1944, vol. XIII, Paris, 1962, no. 130, illustrated pl. 70
The Picasso Project, ed., Picasso's Paintings, Watercolors, Drawings and Sculpture: Nazi Occupation 1940-1944, San Francisco, 1999, no. 43-302, illustrated p. 288

Description

The still life developed as Picasso's preferred motif during World War II, for in the commonplace subject he found a means of escape. Thus rather than documenting the chaotic reality of his surroundings, he successfully created an alternate, meticulously structured reality. Frances Morris wrote of Picasso's still lifes of the early 1940s: “above all it was the still-life genre that Picasso developed into a tool capable of evoking the most complex blend of pathos and defiance, of despair to hope, balancing personal and universal experience in an expression of extraordinary emotional power. The hardship of daily life, the fragility of human existence and the threat of death are themes that haunt Picasso's still-life paintings of the war and Liberation periods” (Frances Morris, Paris Post War, Art and Existentialism 1945-1955 (exhibition catalogue), Tate Gallery, London, 1993, p. 155).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York