116
116

PROPERTY FROM A NEW YORK ESTATE

Edgar Degas
ARABESQUE SUR LA JAMBE DROITE, LA MAIN DROITE PRÈS DE TERRE, LE BRAS GAUCHE EN DEHORS
Estimation
200 000300 000
Lot. Vendu 233,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
116

PROPERTY FROM A NEW YORK ESTATE

Edgar Degas
ARABESQUE SUR LA JAMBE DROITE, LA MAIN DROITE PRÈS DE TERRE, LE BRAS GAUCHE EN DEHORS
Estimation
200 000300 000
Lot. Vendu 233,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Edgar Degas
1834 - 1917
ARABESQUE SUR LA JAMBE DROITE, LA MAIN DROITE PRÈS DE TERRE, LE BRAS GAUCHE EN DEHORS
Inscribed Degas, numbered 2 HER and stamped with the foundry mark Cire Perdue A.A. Hebrard
Bronze
Length: 14 7/8 in.
37.8 cm
Conceived in wax in 1882-95; this bronze version cast in 1919-37 in an edition of 22, numbered A to T plus 2 casts reserved for the artist's heirs and the Hébrard foundry. 
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

M. Knoedler & Co., New York
Acquired from the above on January 24, 1966

Bibliographie

John Rewald, Degas, Works in Sculpture, A Complete Catalogue, New York, 1944, no. XLI, illustration of another cast p. 96
Pierre Boral, Les sculptés inédites de Degas, Geneva, 1947, illustration of another cast pl. 17
John Rewald & Leonard von Matt, L'Oeuvre sculpté de Degas, Zurich, 1957, no. XLI, illustration of another cast fig. 17
Franco Russoli, L'Opera completa di Degas, Milan, 1970, no. S3, illustration of another cast p. 140
John Rewald, Degas's Complete Sculpture: Catalogue Raisonné, San Francisco, 1990, no. XLI, illustration of another cast pp. 120-21
Anne Pingeot, Degas Sculptures, Paris, 1991, no. 3, illustration of the original wax model p. 154
Sara Campbell, "A Catalogue of Degas' Bronzes," in Apollo, vol. CXLII, no. 402, August 1995, no. 2, illustration of another cast p. 12
Joseph S. Czestochowski & Anne Pingeot, Degas Sculptures, Catalogue Raisonné of the Bronzes, Memphis, 2002, no. 2, illustration of another cast p. 124
Sara Campbell, Richard Kendall, Daphne Barbour & Shelley Sturman, Degas in the Norton Simon Museum, Nineteenth-century Art, vol. II, Pasadena, 2009, no. 66, illustration of another cast p. 363

Description

The fervent exploration of movement is a defining feature of the oeuvre of Edgar Degas, and nowhere is his exceptional aptitude for representing the human form in motion more evident than in his sculpture, the medium which offered him the most possibilities for capturing the grace and beauty of these figures. John Rewald writes that, “it was in his passionate search for movement that all the statuettes of dancers doing arabesques, bowing, rubbing their knees, putting their stockings on, etc., and of women arranging their hair, stretching, rubbing their neck and so on were created. All these women are caught in poses which represent one single instant, in an arrested movement which is pregnant with the movement just completed and the one about to follow. To use Baudelaire’s words, Degas ‘loved the human body as a material harmony, as a beautiful architecture with the addition of movement’” (John Rewald, op.cit., p. 23).

The pose of the present work is the arabesque, the personification of equilibrium. In the present model the exquisite balance between the expressively worked surface and delicate poise of the dancer’s pose exemplifies the finest qualities of Degas’ sculpture. Jill DeVonyar and Richard Kendall discuss the significance of this pose in nineteenth-century classical dance and the three-dimensional complexity that it offered the sculptor: “In Degas’ Arabesque Over Right Leg, we encounter an almost flat back…while the bent knee represents a further departure from the current practice of keeping the extended leg completely straight… In this context we should note that Degas’ sensitively modeled, lyrical figure is represented in the nude, allowing him to give full articulation to the currently preferred pose, and incidentally, to reveal the true shape of his uncorseted model” (Jill DeVonyar & Richard Kendall, Degas and the Dance (exhibition catalogue), Detroit Institute of Arts & Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2002, p. 153).

Of the edition of twenty-two bronzes cast by the A.A. Hébrard Foundry between 1919 and 1937, the sculpures marked HER.D were reserved for the artist's heirs and those marked 2 HER were reserved for the foundry. There are known to exist more than one example with the same markings, most often the case with these HER reserved casts.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York