4
4
Ben Nicholson, O.M.
MAR 55 (SEXTANT)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
4
Ben Nicholson, O.M.
MAR 55 (SEXTANT)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Modern & Post-War British Art

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Londres

Ben Nicholson, O.M.
1894-1982
MAR 55 (SEXTANT)
signed and titled on the backboard
pencil and oil on card laid on the Artist's prepared board
31 by 27.5cm.; 12¼ by 10¾in.
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

Gimpel Fils, London
F.L.S. Murray
Marlborough New London Gallery, London, 1964
Mr & Mrs Seymour Sher
Sale, Christie's London, 29th March 1982, lot 45
Waddington Galleries, London, where acquired by the present owner

Exposition

Zurich, Galerie Charles Lienhard, Ben Nicholson, January - February 1959, cat. no.23;
Hannover, Kestner-Gesellschaft, Ben Nicholson, 26th February – 5th April 1959, cat. no.43, illustrated, with tour to Stadtische Kunsthalle, Mannheim Kunstverein, Hamburg and Museum Folkwang, Essen.

Bibliographie

J.P. Hodin, Ben Nicholson: the Meaning of his Art, Alex Tiranti, London, 1957, illustrated fig.46.

Description

We are grateful to Lee Beard for his kind assistance with the cataloguing of the present work.

Following in his father’s tradition, the still life was a major pre-occupation with Nicholson. The subject of still life presented a design around which Nicholson could explore line, form and colour and experiment further with ideas of abstraction and cubism. The present work displays many of the hallmarks of Nicholson’s wonderfully dynamic still life subjects from the 1950s. Nicholson’s still life paintings from this period contain a bright palette with a greater emphasis on linear movement and rich surface textures. Nicholson’s finely rendered pencil line flows with rhythm across the work delicately indicating the shifting surface on which fragmented forms of the still life are barely discernible. The solidly coloured blocks of reds, blues and black are contrasted against the exposed areas of the lightly textured and transparent background and the patterns of the fragmented forms generate a rhythmic and lyrical sense of movement to the work.


Steven Nash comments on his works of this period: 'These paintings would be impossible without the prior discoveries of Cubism, and perhaps of all the Cubist painters, Juan Gris offers in his work the closest comparisons; Nicholson transformed the Cubist vocabulary, however, into a personal mode of expression more abstract, airy and lyrical’ (Steven A. Nash, Ben Nicholson, Fifty Creative Years of His Art, New York, 1978, p. 83). These still life subjects from the 1940s and 1950s helped establish Nicholson’s reputation as an international contemporary artist.  

Modern & Post-War British Art

|
Londres