20
20

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, CANADA

Paul Cézanne
PAYSAGE DU MIDI
Estimation
700 0001 000 000
Lot. Vendu 845,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
20

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, CANADA

Paul Cézanne
PAYSAGE DU MIDI
Estimation
700 0001 000 000
Lot. Vendu 845,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale

|
New York

Paul Cézanne
1839 - 1906
PAYSAGE DU MIDI

Provenance

Paul Cézanne, fils, Paris (in 1937)

Sale: Galerie Charpentier, Paris, June 16, 1953, lot 22

Daniel Varenne, Switzerland

Knoedler Galleries, New York (1966)

Mrs. Phillip D. Armour, Lake Forest, Illinois & Palm Beach, Florida, (sold: Trosby's, Palm Beach, February 27-28, 1973, lot 37)

Galerie Tamenaga, Tokyo & Paris

Richard L. Feigen Gallery, New York

Acquired from the above

Exposition

Paris, Galerie de la Gazette des Beaux-Arts, Naissance de l'impressionnisme, 1937, no. 83

New York, Finch College Museum of Art, French Landscape Painting from Four Centuries, 1966, no. 41

 

Bibliographie

Lionello Venturi, Cézanne, son art, son oeuvre, vol. I, Paris, 1936, no. 36, p. 75; vol. II, illustrated pl. 8

John Rewald, The Paintings of Paul Cézanne, vol. I, New York, 1996, no. 49, p. 77; vol. II, illustrated p. 18

Description

An exceptionally verdant view of the Provençal landscape is Cézanne's focus in this rare canvas from the mid-1860s.  The abundance of surface texture, invoking the sensory appeal of the landscape, is achieved with thick layers of paint applied by palette knife and broad, vigorous strokes.  It is as if Cézanne was so overwhelmed with the richness of what he saw that he needed to capture it by means of more than just his paintbrush.   John Rewald provided the following analysis of the artist's working method: "The foreground is of an extremely bright and 'troweled' green, and the mountains are of a uniform gray, whereas the lightly clouded sky seems executed with a palette knife  In other places, particularly the foliage and shadows of the very dark trees, the artist appears to have used a small spatula" (J. Rewald, op. cit., p. 87).

 

Lawrence Gowling wrote the following about this early period in Cézanne's career: "Cézanne was the first man [among the Impressionists], perhaps the first man in history, to realize the necessity for the manner in which paint is handled to build up a homogenous and consistent pictorial structure.   This is the invention of form in the French modernist sense - meaning the condition of paint that constitutes a pictorial structure.  It is the discovery of an intrinsic structure inherent in the medium and the material" (L. Gowing, Cézanne, les années de jeunesse, 1859-1872, (exhibition catalogue), Musée d'Orsay, Paris, 1988, p. 10).

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale

|
New York