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24

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF VERONIQUE AND GREGORY PECK

Henri-Edmond Cross
PRINTEMPS ROSE
Estimation
800 0001 200 000
Lot. Vendu 1,205,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
24

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF VERONIQUE AND GREGORY PECK

Henri-Edmond Cross
PRINTEMPS ROSE
Estimation
800 0001 200 000
Lot. Vendu 1,205,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale

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New York

Henri-Edmond Cross
1856-1910
PRINTEMPS ROSE
Signed Henri Edmond Cross and dated 09
Oil on canvas
28 3/4 by 36 1/2 in.
73 by 92 cm
Painted between September 1908 and April 1909.
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

This work will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné of Henri Edmond Cross being prepared by Patrick Offenstandt under the sponsorship of the Wildenstein Institute.

Provenance

Galerie Bernheim-Jeune, Paris

Count Harry Kessler, Weimar

Gustave Coquiot

Private Collection, Paris

William Beadleston Inc., New York

Acquired from the above in 1984

Bibliographie

Artist's stock ledger

Felix Fénéon, Bulletin de la Vie artistique, Paris, May 15, 1922, discussed p. 229

Lucie Cousturier, "H.E. Cross," L'Art Décoratif, Paris, March 1913, illustrated p. 131

Isabelle Compin, H.E. Cross, Paris, 1964, no. 222, illustrated p. 329

Andrea Pophanken, Die Moderne und ihre Sammler: Französische Kunst in deutschem Privatbesitz vom Kaiserreich zur Weimarer Republik, Berlin, 2001, listed p. 88 

Description

In the small village of Cabasson, situated between the sea and Mediterranean pines, Cross began to paint his first Divisionist landscapes. Printemps rose, a fine example of this technique, resembles a carefully composed mosaic of shimmering colors. The tonal variations and juxtapositions in the present work recreate the vibrant, dazzling atmosphere of the Côte d'Azur that became a major source of inspiration for the artist.

When he moved from Paris to the Midi in 1891, the artist was interested in exploring the nuances of light and color with a precision that the Impressionists had never achieved.   In this picture, the modulation of color, the flatness of the forms, and the purity with which Cross applies each dab of paint all characterize the Neo-Impressionist style.  Neo-Impressionism, a movement that evolved from the Impressionist’s emphasis on light and color, was rooted in the color theories of Eugène Michel Chevreul, a French chemist whose studies influenced the work of Cross and Georges Seurat.  In the mid-1880s Seurat expounded upon Chevreul’s teachings in his writings and his numerous studies for Après-midi sur La Grande Jatte.  His developments in this area influenced artists, including Cross, Theo van Rysselberghe, and Paul Signac to adapt the pseudo-scientific principles into their own painting in the 1890s.  While remaining very close to Seurat and Signac, Cross adapted the Divisionist style to his own more rhythmic and bold method.  Instead of a rigid use of dots based on color theories, Cross employed a more liberated and intuitive style, creating a body of work that celebrates the majestic light of the Mediterranean coast.

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale

|
New York