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THE COLLECTION OF ALEX & ELISABETH LEWYT

Paul Cézanne
LA CÔTE DU JALLAIS À PONTOISE
Estimation
700 0001 000 000
Lot. Vendu 605,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
14

THE COLLECTION OF ALEX & ELISABETH LEWYT

Paul Cézanne
LA CÔTE DU JALLAIS À PONTOISE
Estimation
700 0001 000 000
Lot. Vendu 605,000 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale

|
New York

Paul Cézanne
1839 - 1906
LA CÔTE DU JALLAIS À PONTOISE
Pencil and watercolor on paper
12 3/8 by 19 1/2 in.
31.5 by 49.5 cm
Executed circa 1877-81.
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

Ambroise Vollard, Paris

Vollard Estate, Paris

Robert de Galéa, Paris (acquired from the above)

Rosenberg & Stiebel, New York

Otto Wertheimer, Paris

Jean-Pierre Durand-Matthiesen, Geneva

Walter Feilchenfeldt, Zurich

Jacques Koerfer, Bern

Galerie Durand-Matthiesen, Geneva

Acquired from the above in June 1955

Exposition

New York, Fine Arts Associates (Otto Gerson), Cézanne, 1956, no.    3, illustrated in the catalogue

New York, Wildenstein & Co., Inc., Cézanne, 1959, no. 61, illustrated in the catalogue

New York, Knoedler Galleries, Cézanne Watercolors, 1963, no. 11, illustrated in the catalogue

Pasadena Art Museum, Cézanne Watercolors, 1967, no. 3, illustrated in color in the catalogue

Bibliographie

Vollard archives no. 195

G. Schmidt, Aquarelle von Paul Cézanne, Basel, 1952, p. 28, illustrated pl. 8

Theodore Reff, "A New Exhibition of Cézanne," Burlington Magazine, 1960, CII, p. 117

Jiří Siblík, Paul Cézanne, Dessins, Prague, 1968 & Paris, 1972, illustrated p. 43

John Rewald, Paul Cézanne. The Watercolours: A Catalogue Raisonné, London, 1983, no. 75, catalogued p. 104, illustrated

Description

 La Côte du Jallais à Pontoise reveals the strong influence of Cézanne's fruitful collaboration with Pissarro in the French countryside around Paris during the 1870s. From 1871, the artists would venture together into the verdant environs of Pontoise, a small town outside of Paris, and expand the boundaries of Impressionist painting. Though their styles would converge, by the end of that decade, when he executed the present work, Cézanne was looking beyond the tenets of Impressionism toward the development of a new artistic vocabulary. Though the iconic cypress trees and rolling hills situate this work in the Pontoise period, the isolated brushstrokes and geometric forms reveal the direction that would bring Cézanne to the precipice of Modernism.

Cézanne in looking back on his years working with Pissarro stated: "I too was an Impressionist, I won't hide it. Pissarro had an enormous influence on me. But I wanted to make of impressionist something solid and enduring like the art of museums. I said as much to Maurice Denis... But, listen, a green patch is enough to give us a landscape, just as a flesh tone translated into a face, or gives us a human figure. Which means that all of us perhaps come out of Pissarro... Already in [18]65 he had eliminated black, bitumen, sienna and the ochers [from his palette]. That's a fact. Paint only with the three primary colors and their immediate derivatives, he told me" (quoted in Alex Danchev, Cézanne: A Life, New York, 2012, p. 197).

In his catalogue raisonné of the artist's watercolors, John Rewald writes of the present work: "The underlying pencil drawing shows that is a carefully prepared landscape composition. R. Arnold considered it to be 'closely related to a painting of the same scene made in the years 1879-82 (Venturi no. 319). In its fresh, almost naive charm, the sketch bears witness to Cézanne's contact with the Impressionists. The tonality is cool; areas of white paper left unworked suggest the play of air and light; the brush moves fluently, setting off brisk diagonal accents in the foliage against flat washes in field and sky. An air of spontaneity informs the whole" (John Rewald, op. cit., p. 104).

Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale

|
New York