330
330

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Henri Le Sidaner
LES BARQUES À LA ROCHELLE
Estimation
180 000250 000
Lot. Vendu 482,500 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
330

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Henri Le Sidaner
LES BARQUES À LA ROCHELLE
Estimation
180 000250 000
Lot. Vendu 482,500 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist and Modern Day Sale Afternoon session

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Londres

Henri Le Sidaner
1862 - 1939
LES BARQUES À LA ROCHELLE
signed Le Sidaner (lower right)
oil on canvas
65.4 by 81.5cm., 25 3/4 by 32 3/4 in.
Painted in La Rochelle in 1923.
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

Galerie Georges Petit, Paris
Private Collection, France
Sale: Salle Rossini, Paris, 25th June 2002, lot 51
Sale: Sotheby's, London, 6th November 2002, lot 167
Private Collection, USA (purchased at the above sale)
Sale: Sotheby's, London, 9th February 2005, lot 444
Purchased at the above sale by the present owner

Bibliographie

Camille Mauclair, Le Sidaner, Paris, 1928, illustrated p. 144
Yann Farinaux-Le Sidaner, Le Sidaner, L'Œuvre peint et gravé, Milan, 1989, no. 503, illustrated p. 194

Description

In the present work, Henri Le Sidaner has captured the port of La Rochelle at the moment just before the light gives out following the setting of the sun below the horizon, prompting the first flickering of illumination inside the houses opposite. The fleeting play of colour and light on the water and boats is rendered here in compelling detail, exuding a dream-like sense of calm that might be broken at any moment. His creative process is revealed through a charming anecdote from the artist’s son, Rémy: ‘My father would give me his usual sign and we would stop still whilst he scrutinised the horizon, committing what he saw to memory […] he often made a colour sketch of the site, but this had nothing to do with the effect, which would later be committed to canvas in his studio from memory alone; they were too fleeting and too changeable to be painted on the spot.’ (R. Le Sidaner, ‘Le Peintre Henri Le Sidaner tel que j’ai connu’, in Henri le Sidaner (exhibition catalogue), Musée Marmotton, Paris, 1989,
p. 11).

The present work is striking for its glistening and jewel-like palette but above all for being exemplary of the artist’s much-fêted ability to capture the intangible and mystical atmosphere of a particular moment in time. He was not a painter of people  but a painter of the nuances of place and of time: ‘He considered that the silent harmony of things is enough to evoke the presence of those who live among them. Indeed such presences are felt throughout his works. Deserted they may be, but never empty.’ (Camille Mauclair, Henri Le Sidaner, Paris, 1928, p. 12)

Impressionist and Modern Day Sale Afternoon session

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Londres