256
256
A very fine presentation sword taken as booty at the Siege of Seringapatam, of Eastern European manufacture, late 16th century
Estimation
80 000100 000
Lot. Vendu 88,900 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
256
A very fine presentation sword taken as booty at the Siege of Seringapatam, of Eastern European manufacture, late 16th century
Estimation
80 000100 000
Lot. Vendu 88,900 GBP (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Art of Imperial India

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Londres

A very fine presentation sword taken as booty at the Siege of Seringapatam, of Eastern European manufacture, late 16th century
the hilt with broad crossguard, elongated forte and bud quillons, incised with foliate decoration at the grip, with a ridged curved steel blade, the scabbard with a row of embossed foliate medallions, each with a colourful stone or glass to centre, two loops for hanging, later engraved at the lock: Taken from Tippoo Saib, Seringapatam, 1799
Quantité: 2
sword: 96cm.
scabbard: 85cm.
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Provenance

Ex collection John Walzzak
The greater part of his collection was donated to and is now on display at the Muzeum Wojska Polskiego, (Museum of the Polish Army), in Warsaw.

Description

On Saturday the 4th May 1799, Tipu's fortress at Seringapatam was stormed by the British army under General Sir David Baird accompanied by Colonel Arthur Wellesley (the future Duke of Wellington). This very fine presentation sword, from the Eastern European provinces of the Ottoman Empire, must have at one time been given to Tipu Sultan as a diplomatic gift and was taken from Seringapatam as booty (as recorded on the scabbard). 

Tipu's palace was renowned for the array of arms and armour accommodated there. The Scottish chronicler Beatson recorded that  "In his palace was found a great variety of curious swords, daggers, fusils, pistols, and blunderbusses; some were of exquisite workmanship, mounted with gold, or silver and beautifully inlaid and ornamented..." (J. Grant, Cassell's History of India, London, 1898, p.344).

Art of Imperial India

|
Londres