37
37
Jehan Georges Vibert
FRENCH
THE CANON'S DINNER
Estimation
50 00070 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT
37
Jehan Georges Vibert
FRENCH
THE CANON'S DINNER
Estimation
50 00070 000
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

19th Century European Art

|
New York

Jehan Georges Vibert
1840 - 1902
FRENCH
THE CANON'S DINNER
signed J. G. Vibert and dated 1875 (lower right)
oil on panel
21 by 28 7/8 in.
53.3 by 73.3 cm
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Provenance

John T. Martin, Brooklyn (by circa 1880 and sold, his sale, American Art Association, New York, April 15-16, 1909, lot 27, illustrated)
George Crocker, New York (acquired at the above sale and sold by his Estate, American Art Association, New York, January 24, 1912, lot 44, illustrated)
Mrs. Peter W. Rouss (acquired at the above sale and sold, American Art Associaton/Anderson Galleries, New York, October 22, 1936, lot 78, illustrated)
Hugo Lehrfeld, New York (acquired at the above sale)
Thence by descent to the present owner

Bibliographie

Edward Strahan, ed., The Art Treasures of America, Philadelphia, 1879, vol. III, pp. 61-2, illustrated opp. p. 61; in the 1977 facsimile edition, vol. II. pp. 127-8, 130, illustrated opp. p. 128 (as La Sainte Collation)

 

 

Description

In the late nineteenth century the collection of Brooklyn’s John T. Martin was considered one of the very best in the United States (see also lot 56).  When viewing the present lot in Martin’s galleries for his The Art Treasures of America the always verbose Edward Strahan asked: “is there any basis for the current notion that the appreciation of good cooking rises with the advance in ecclesiastical preferment?” (1977 facsimile edition, p. 127)  Strahan’s question is particularly pointed when considering Vibert’s detailed, painted feast of a large red lobster and plump goose served with all manner of culinary accoutrements.  As was his trademark, Vibert gently satirizes the clergy as the prelate enjoys his luxe meal while, according to Strahan, his “secretary, whose reception of nutriment is so entirely vicarious, may find the present a favorable occasion for learning that the true enjoyment of the table is not mere feeding, but the intelligent appreciation of sensation” (p. 127).

19th Century European Art

|
New York