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PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT AMERICAN COLLECTOR

Louis Majorelle
"MAGNOLIA" THREE-LIGHT TABLE LAMP
Estimation
120 000180 000
Lot. Vendu 146,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT
70

PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT AMERICAN COLLECTOR

Louis Majorelle
"MAGNOLIA" THREE-LIGHT TABLE LAMP
Estimation
120 000180 000
Lot. Vendu 146,500 USD (Prix d’adjudication avec commission acheteur)
ACCÉDER AU LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important 20th Century Design

|
New York

Louis Majorelle
"MAGNOLIA" THREE-LIGHT TABLE LAMP
one shade engraved DAUM/NANCY and with the Croix de Lorraine
gilt bronze and wheel-carved glass
31 3/8 in. (79.6 cm) high
circa 1903
in collaboration with Auguste and Antonin Daum
Lire le rapport d'état Lire le rapport d'état

Provenance

Private Collection of Lillian Nassau, New York
Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2003

Bibliographie

Chantal Bizot and Edith Mannoni, Mobilier 1900-1925, Paris, 1977, p. 27
Alastair Duncan, Art Nouveau and Art Deco Lighting, New York, 1978,  xvi
Wolf Uecker, Lampen und Leuchter:  Art Nouveau, Art Déco, Herrsching am Ammersee, Germany, 1978, p. 129
Noël Daum, Daum: Maîtres Verriers, Lausanne, 1980, p. 142
Roselyne Bouvier, Majorelle:  Une Aventure Moderne, Paris, 1991, front cover and p. 189
Christian Debize, Émile Gallé & l'École de Nancy, Metz, 1998, pp. 74-75 (for the model shown in a period catalogue and for example of the "Magnolia" table lamp in the collection of Musée de l'École de Nancy)
Alastair Duncan, Louis Majorelle: Master of Art Nouveau Design, London, 1991, pl. 132 (for a related example in patinated bronze) and  pp. 149, 168-169, 173, and 214 (for the model shown in a period catalogue and other period photographs)
Paul Greenhalgh, ed., Art Nouveau: 1890-1914, London, 2000, p. 61
Roselyne Bouvier et al., Musée de l'École de Nancy, Paris, 2001, p. 51

Description

Louis Majorelle, a leading member of the École de Nancy and proponent of the Art Nouveau style, forged an important collaboration in the early 1890s with Daum glassworks to produce lighting fixtures after botanical motifs. This commercial venture, which ultimately spanned the course of three decades, resulted in some of the most spectacular and iconic expressions of the Art Nouveau style. The inspiration for Majorelle's lamps designs came from numerous indigenous plants. The bases, composed of bronze or wrought-iron, were naturalistically sculpted in the form of slender stems or branches to support a variety of floriform glass shades. Electric wires were conspicuously concealed within the hollow-cast bases to avoid any interruption with the naturalistic designs.

An illustration in the firm's sales catalogue promotes electric table lamps fitted with different floriform glass shades supplied by Daum, including a water lily, dandelion, pitcher plant and magnolia. Majorelle exhibited these lamps as both individual statements alongside furniture at the salons, and as integral elements within room ensembles unified by botanical themes. The "magnolia" lamp presently offered is today celebrated as one of the top icons of the Art Nouveau movement and one of Majorelle's most successful lighting designs. The impressive model was designed for the Exposition de l'École de Nancy in 1903, and appears in numerous interiors featured in the firm's sales catalogues.

Important 20th Century Design

|
New York