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38
John Arnold, London
A HIGHLY IMPORTANT LARGE SILVER CONSULAR CASED POCKET CHRONOMETER OF "THE BEST KIND" AND THE ONLY KNOWN EXAMPLE TO SURVIVE IN ITS ORIGINAL STATE WITH DOUBLE ‘S’ BALANCE 1781, NO. 23/78 
Estimación
130.000150.000
Lote. Vendido 557,000 GBP (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE
38
John Arnold, London
A HIGHLY IMPORTANT LARGE SILVER CONSULAR CASED POCKET CHRONOMETER OF "THE BEST KIND" AND THE ONLY KNOWN EXAMPLE TO SURVIVE IN ITS ORIGINAL STATE WITH DOUBLE ‘S’ BALANCE 1781, NO. 23/78 
Estimación
130.000150.000
Lote. Vendido 557,000 GBP (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE

Details & Cataloguing

Celebration of the English Watch Part II: John Harrison’s Enduring Discovery

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Londres

John Arnold, London
A HIGHLY IMPORTANT LARGE SILVER CONSULAR CASED POCKET CHRONOMETER OF "THE BEST KIND" AND THE ONLY KNOWN EXAMPLE TO SURVIVE IN ITS ORIGINAL STATE WITH DOUBLE ‘S’ BALANCE 1781, NO. 23/78 
Movement: gilded full plate movement with Arnold pivoted detent escapement, free-sprung ‘S’ balance, blued steel helical spring, decoratively pierced and engraved balance cock, fusee and chain, turned pillars • movement signed John Arnold, London, Inv. et Fecit London No. 23/78
Dial: white enamel dial, Roman numerals, outer minute ring, large subsidiary seconds, blued steel hands • dial signed and numbered 78
Case: plain polished double bottomed silver case, the back opening to reveal fixed cuvette with winding aperture, maker’s mark ITP incuse for John Terrill Pain and hallmarked 1781
diameter 73 mm
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Procedencia

Joseph Bond - Bond had a servicing business in Boston, the watch appears in his records on 30th July 1834 (Bond Papers, M.M.G. Vol. 1, F. 26)
T.P. Camerer-Cuss purchased 1947 from a private collection

Expuesto

Science Museum, London, Antiquarian Horological Society Tenth Anniversary Exhibition, 1964

Documentación

Terrence Camerer Cuss, The English Watch, 1585-1970, 2009, pp. 274-275, pl. 168
Hans Staeger, 100 Years of Precision Timekeepers from John Arnold to Arnold & Frodsham 1763-1862, 1997, pp. 67-68
Vaudrey Mercer, John Arnold & Son, 1972, pp. 48, 59, 210
T.P. Camerer Cuss, The Country Life Books of Watches, 1967, p. 69

Nota del catálogo

John Arnold used the pivoted detent escapement up to 1782 and the spring detent thereafter. Arnold introduced the ‘double S’ balance in 1780. The ‘S’ sections of the balance were shaped bi-metallic bars that were designed to overcome the changing elasticity of the balance spring and expansion of the balance’s rim. Arguably amongst the most elegant compensated balances ever made, only around a dozen watches survive with the double ‘S’ or ‘T’ balances. Only two watches survive complete with their original cases, dials and pivoted detents, having a ‘double T’ balance (number 1/36 and 2/43 – although the balance of the latter has been restored). Only the present watch, number 23/78, survives without restoration and with its original case, dial, pivoted detent and ‘double S’ balance.

Born in Cornwall, John Arnold (1736-1799) is one of England’s most famous and important watchmakers. Initially apprenticed to his father, a Clockmaker from Bodmin, John Arnold almost certainly worked for a time as a gunsmith with his Uncle, William (see Vaudrey Mercer, John Arnold & Son, p.4). In the mid 1750s, John Arnold travelled to Holland where he continued work as a watchmaker’s assistant and it is here that he learnt German which doubtless proved a great asset in his later connections with King George III’s court. In 1762 he moved to London and shortly thereafter presented a repeating watch mounted on a ring to King George III. The watch created a sensation and was widely reported upon with details included in the “Annual Register” for 1764 and the “Gentleman’s Magazine” of the same year. It has been suggested by several
researchers, including Cedric Jagger in his book Royal Clocks, that John Arnold was encouraged by King George III to “enter the ‘longitude’ arena” and make an accurate
timekeeper for use at sea. Arnold’s first attempt at a marine timepiece was completed in 1768 and presented before the Board of Longitude in 1770. Arnold realised that a detatched escapement would be highly desirable and this led him to invent his early detatched escapement in c.1770, followed by his spring detent (which bears his name) in c.1782. To overcome isochronal variation, Arnold took out a patent for a helical spring in December 1775 and used this with his ‘double T’ and ‘double S’ balances. Arnold realized that a detached escapement would be highly desirable and this led him to invent a detent escapement, circa 1781, which bears his name. In 1787 he took his son, John Roger Arnold, into partnership, changing the business name to “Arnold & Son”, which was retained until his death. A detailed examination of the life and work of John Arnold is given in Vaudrey Mercer’s definitive work on the maker entitled John Arnold & Son, published by the Antiquarian Horological Society in 1972.

Celebration of the English Watch Part II: John Harrison’s Enduring Discovery

|
Londres