29
29

PROPERTY OF A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Andy Warhol
MARILYN MONROE (F. & S. II.22-31)
Lote. Vendido 1,505,000 GBP (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE
29

PROPERTY OF A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Andy Warhol
MARILYN MONROE (F. & S. II.22-31)
Lote. Vendido 1,505,000 GBP (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE

Details & Cataloguing

Contemporary Art Evening Auction

|
Londres

Andy Warhol
1928 - 1987
MARILYN MONROE (F. & S. II.22-31)
each: signed and stamp-numbered 136/250 on the reverse, published by Factory Additions, New York

the complete portfolio of 10 colour screenprints on paper, accompanied by the original stamp-numbered box

each: 91.4 by 91.4cm.; 36 by 36in.

Executed in 1967, this work is number 136 from an edition of 250 plus 26 artist’s proofs.


Leer informe de condiciones Leer informe de condiciones

Procedencia

Private Collection, Europe

Christie's, London, Post-War and Contemporary Art Evening Sale, 4 February 2004, Lot 5

Acquired directly from the above by the present owner

Expuesto

Hamburg, Hamburg Kunsthalle; and Pittsburgh, The Andy Warhol Museum, Andy Warhol. Photography, 1999-2000, p. 55, another example illustrated in colour

Fécamp, Palais Bénédictine, Andy Warhol: Pop' Star, 2000, n.p., illustrated in colour

Milan, Triennale di Milano, The Andy Warhol Show, 2004-05, pp. 88-89, no. 11, another example illustrated in colour

Naples, Palazzo delle Arti di Napoli, Andy Warhol, Vetrine, 2014, pp. 126-27, another example illustrated in colour

Documentación

Hermann Wünsche, Andy Warhol: Das Graphische Werk 1962-1980, Bonn 1980, p. 39, illustrated in colour

Germano Celant, Ed., Super Warhol, Milan 2003, pp. 266-67, no. 114, another example illustrated in colour

Freyda Feldman and Jörg Schellmann, Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné 1962-1967, New York 2003, pp. 68-69, no. 11.22-31, another example illustrated in colour

Nota del catálogo

At the height of her fame in the 1950s and early 60s, there were few more celebrated figures in American culture than Marilyn Monroe. Warhol’s instantly recognisable and wildly popular representations of Monroe have played a major part in her lasting reputation as a cultural icon and sex symbol many decades later. The present work, a portfolio of ten screenprints, printed in varied colour combinations in 1967, is without doubt amongst the most important and desirable of all Warhol’s graphic works. To see all ten of these works offered for auction, each numbered uniformly with their colours still fresh and vibrant, constitutes a rare opportunity to obtain a seminal piece of Pop art. This groundbreaking portfolio is emblematic of Warhol’s ability to challenge conventional notions of originality and beauty in art. Taking a publicity still for the 1953 film, Niagara, Warhol transformed an otherwise banal stock photograph into one of the most momentous images of mid twentieth-century art.

In the late 1960s, Andy Warhol began publishing print portfolios with the art dealer David Whitney under the name Factory Additions. These works originated from some of his most famous subjects produced earlier in the decade such as Marilyn, Flowers and Campbell’s Soup. Warhol had begun experimenting with screeprinting in 1962, originally as a method for producing paintings from blown up photographs. Later he used silkscreens to create editioned prints, such as the Marilyn portfolio. From the 1960s onwards, prints became a hugely significant component of Warhol’s artistic output. These Marilyn prints were Warhol’s first technically complex prints, allowing the artist to achieve more than he had previously been able to with the medium. “Although the Marilyn paintings had been realised in an array of colours, these went further: a palette of fiery reds, hot and pale pink, and other saturated hues transforms [sic] Marilyn’s face into even more of a fiction than the carefully crafted publicity still from which it was originally derived” (Donna de Salvo, ‘God is in the details: The Prints of Andy Warhol’, in: Freyda Feldman and Jörg Schellmann, Eds., Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1962-1967, New York 2003, p. 24).

In his depiction of Monroe, Warhol assumed the same cool and detached perspective with which he approached all of his subjects including consumer goods, celebrities, sex and disasters. However Marilyn Monroe was perhaps Warhol’s only subject that was able to fit into all of these categories; she was tragic, sexy and consumable all at the same time, making her the perfect embodiment of the artist’s ideals, and in fact, of the ideals of Pop art more generally.

Contemporary Art Evening Auction

|
Londres