447
447

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR, FRANCE

A magnificent silver-gilt tea and coffee service, Ovchinnikov, Moscow, 1870-1871
Lote. Vendido 470,500 GBP (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE
447

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR, FRANCE

A magnificent silver-gilt tea and coffee service, Ovchinnikov, Moscow, 1870-1871
Lote. Vendido 470,500 GBP (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE

Details & Cataloguing

Russian Works of Art, Fabergé and Icons

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Londres

A magnificent silver-gilt tea and coffee service, Ovchinnikov, Moscow, 1870-1871
in Pan-Slavic taste, comprising a samovar, tea pot, coffee pot, sugar bowl, cream jug, cake basket, waste bowl, tray, tea strainer and sugar tongs, the surfaces engraved to simulate wood grain centring Cyrillic initials AKL below the coronet of a count, within bold geometric borders, the spouts and handles cast with cockerel heads, the samovar, cake basket and waste bowl applied with pierced friezes, addorsed horse head finials, ivory insulators, 84 standard, in two silk lined and fitted original Ovchinnikov wood cases with plaques engraved '6 Avril 1876'
Cantidad: 10
height of samovar 54cm, 21 1/4 in.
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Procedencia

Countess Alexandra Karlovna Litke

Nota del catálogo

Countess Alexandra Litke (1849-1893), daughter of Count Karl Friedrich Konstantinovich Rehbinder, married Rear-Admiral Count Konstantin Feodorovich Litke (1837-1892) on 10 January 1869.  Count Litke was the son of Friedrich Benjamin von Lütke (Russified to Feodor Petrovich Litke), tutor to Emperor Nicholas I, Arctic explorer, President of the Russian Academy of Science, Admiral of the Russian Navy from 1855 and a Count of the Russian Empire from 1866.  Alexandra would pass away the year after her first husband, having re-married Prince Nikolai Alexandrovich Dondoukov-Korsakov. 

The same design was employed by Ovchinnikov on a tea service, lacking a samovar, which sold, Sotheby's Zurich, 23 November 1973, lot 60, and the samovar, illustrated, G. Hill, Fabergé and the Russian Master Goldsmiths, 1989, pl. 206, p. 251.

Ovchinnikov        

Born into the most humble beginnings, Pavel Akimovich Ovchinnikov (d.1888) is a fine demonstration of the rapid developments in Russian society in the 19th century. A serf of Duke Volkonski, he was apprenticed to his brother’s goldsmithery in Moscow as an able draftsman. In 1853 he made use of his wife's dowry to establish his own workshop and the growth of this business was explosive: by 1870 the factory employed ninety workmasters within tightly-organised workshops and turned over 250,000 roubles annually and by 1881 was larger than any competitor. Validations of the firm’s success came in 1865 when it was made Supplier to the Court of the Tsarevich and in 1882 and 1883, when it won first prize at the All-Russia Exhibition and was granted the Imperial Warrant. 

In the first half of the 19th century foreign gold and silver manufacturers faced very little competition from within Russia, Ignatius Sazikov being a rare example. The strong national character of Ovchinnikov's designs was of great appeal domestically and furthermore were produced to the high standards ordinarily only expected of continental workshops. Although working across a wide variety of objects and media, the firm established a reputation for its technically daring enamel work with particular praise given at the 1893 Chicago and 1900 Paris World Fairs, even after the running of the company had been passed to the original founder’s sons.

Russian decorative arts of the late Imperial era owe a significant debt to the extraordinary talents and energy of the self-made Pavel Akimovich. His efforts firmly established a unique Russian aesthetic and threw off the yoke of Western European dominance. His patriotic and moral ideas, espoused through his 1881 publication Some Information about the Organisation of the Workers’ and Trainees Live in Factories and Handicraft Schools, demonstrate an understanding and respect for the working classes of Russia, which was no doubt key to his success. Furthermore, it is certain that Carl Fabergé looked to the sterling example of Ovchinnikov when re-organising the structure and ideology of his father’s business in St Petersburg in 1882. 

Russian Works of Art, Fabergé and Icons

|
Londres