114
114
Songye "Four Horn" Community Power Figure, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Lote. Vendido 2,165,000 USD (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE
114
Songye "Four Horn" Community Power Figure, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Lote. Vendido 2,165,000 USD (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE

Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of Allan Stone: African, Oceanic, and Indonesian Art – Volume One

|
New York

Songye "Four Horn" Community Power Figure, Democratic Republic of the Congo
with three Common Waterbuck Antelope (Kobus ellipsiprumnus) horns and one Domestic Goat (Capra hircus) horn attached to the head, a beaded collar of Common Waterbuck Antelope (Kobus ellipsiprumnus) hide around the neck, and an African Civet (Civettictis civetta) hide draped from the waist.
Height: 21 7/8 in (55.7 cm)
Height as mounted: 31 5/8  in (80.5 cm)
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Procedencia

Reportedly Ralph Nash, London, 1970s or earlier
Merton D. Simpson, New York, acquired from the above ca. 1980
Allan Stone, New York, acquired from the above presumably in June 1981

Expuesto

The Mary and Leigh Block Art Gallery, Northwestern University, Evanston, Wild Spirits - Strong Medicine: African Art and the Wilderness, September 21 - November 22, 1989; additional venues:
The Lowe Art Museum, The University of Miami, Miami, December 14, 1989 - January 28, 1990
The Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, February 18 - April 30, 1990
The Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, September 15 - December 1, 1990
Museum for African Art, New York, Exhibition-ism: Museums and African Art, October 14, 1994 - March 5, 1995
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Africa: the Art of a Continent, 100 Works of Power and Beauty, June 7 - September 29, 1996
The Bruce Museum, Greenwich, Connecticut, Power Incarnate: Allan Stone's Collection of Sculpture from the Congo, May 14 - September 4, 2011
S2 Gallery, New York, Hunters and Gatherers: The Art of Assemblage, November 18 - December 16, 2011

Documentación

Merton D. Simpson (adv.), African Arts, Vol. XIV, No. 1, November 1980, p. 1
Martha G. Anderson, Wild Spirits, Strong Medicine: African Art and the Wilderness, New York, 1989, p. 123, cat. no. 82
Mary Nooter Roberts, Susan M. Vogel, and Chris Müller, Exhibition-ism: Museums and African Art, New York, 1994, p. 17, fig. 3 (sketch)
Anthony Shelton, Fetishism: Visualizing Power and Desire, London, 1995, color plate 11
Tom Phillips (ed.), Africa: the Art of a Continent, 100 Works of Power and Beauty, New York, 1996, pp. 108-109, cat. no. 51
François Neyt, Songye : la redoutable statuaire songye d'Afrique centrale, Brussels, 2004, pp. 100 and 344, pl. 63  
François Neyt, Songye: the Formidable Statuary of Central Africa, New York, 2009, pp. 100 and 344, pl. 63
Kevin D. Dumouchelle, Power Incarnate: Allan Stone's Collection of Sculpture from the Congo, Greenwich, Connecticut, 2011, pp. 6 and 54, cat. 31
Lisa Dennison and Adam Gopnick (eds.), Hunters and Gatherers: The Art of Assemblage, New York, 2011, pp. 11, 106-107
No author, "Art in Motion", Tribal Arts Magazine, No. 69, Autumn 2013, p. 28
Ellen Gamerman, “An Eccentric’s African Trove”, The Wall Street Journal, July 13, 2013, p. C14
Olga Grimm-Weissert, "Hauptstadt der Stammeskunst", Die Zeit, No. 35, August 22, 2013, p. 46

Nota del catálogo

In her discussion of the Allan Stone Four-Horn Statue at the occasion of the Wild Spirits, Strong Medicine: African Art and the Wilderness exhibition at the Museum for African Art, New York, Martha Anderson (1989: 123) notes: "Because large figures invoke the assistance of supreme ancestral spirits they are imbued with greater power than personal objects that rely on more transitory, earth-bound, wandering spirits for their power."

Crowning the sculpture with four horns, each pointing into one of the cardinal directions, the artist of the Stone figure created an unforgettable image of power and vitality. The spirit represented here dominates its surrounding space, embodying the reach and vigilance of its engagement with the world. The dynamic movement of the horns concentrates at their foot, as if bundled by the head, and comes to rest in the serene expression of the figure's face, where time stands still. Through this juxtaposition of opposing qualities, the unknown artist created one of the most arresting works of all figurative sculpture - a universal masterpiece.

Widely published and exhibited, the "Four-Horn" statue from the Allan Stone Collection is an icon of African art.

The Collection of Allan Stone: African, Oceanic, and Indonesian Art – Volume One

|
New York