12
12
Cindy Sherman
UNTITLED #212
Estimación
180.000220.000
Lote. Vendido 182,500 USD (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE
12
Cindy Sherman
UNTITLED #212
Estimación
180.000220.000
Lote. Vendido 182,500 USD (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE

Details & Cataloguing

Art in Focus

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New York

Cindy Sherman
B.1954
UNTITLED #212
signed, dated 1989, and numbered 3/6 on the backing board
chromogenic color print in artist's frame
41 1/4 by 32 1/4 in.
104.8 by 81.9 cm.
Executed in 1989, this work is number 3 from an edition of 6.
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Expuesto

Metro Pictures, New York

Documentación

Arthur C. Danto, Cindy Sherman History Portraits, Munich / Paris, 1991, n.p., illustrated in color
Rosalind E. Krauss, Cindy Sherman 1975-1993, New York, 1993, p. 228, illustrated in color
Eva Respini, John Waters, Johanna Burton, Cindy Sherman, New York, 2012, pl. 126, p. 179, illustrated in color, another example illustrated

Nota del catálogo

In 1988, Cindy Sherman was commissioned to create a limited edition set of porcelain dishware for Artes Magnus, on which she replicated her likeness dressed as Madame de Pompadour. Following this project, Sherman began a series known as the History Portraits, as an intensive exploration of portraiture dating from the 16th through 19th century.


The characters and scenes depicted in the 35 works in the History Portraits series are largely fictionalized, showing Sherman posed with prosthetics and make-up, often cross-dressing as a man, and draped in period-style clothing. Like the fictional characters from Sherman’s Untitled Film Stills or Centerfolds series, Untitled #212 does not refer to any specific historical figure, but rather depicts a caricature, a woman seemingly from the Renaissance period, posed in front of a marble column or adjacent to a statue of the Virgin Mary. Her heavy make-up is unevenly applied and a protruding prosthetic nose betrays the deliberate manipulation of the image.

From a cursory glance, this picture, in a replicated gilded frame, could be in any portrait hall in a museum; yet under closer inspection, this illusion comes apart. Indeed, these visible, artificial disguises mirror the artifice of the constructed identities in Sherman’s History Portraits. The crude details that Sherman deliberately and painstakingly applies seem to echo the meticulous, labored, and detail-oriented process of Old Master painting. In the art historical tradition, it is standard practice for young artists to copy Old Master works in their training, yet Sherman undermines this classical practice by assuming the conventionally male-dominated role of artist. Both in subject and execution, Sherman draws parallels and distinctions between her work and the work of her artistic precedents, exonerating and satirizing the canon of art history. As MoMA curator Eva Respini asserts, “Even where her pictures offer a gleam of art historical recognition, Sherman has inserted her own interpretation of these ossified paintings, turning them into contemporary artifacts of a bygone era.” (Respini, Cindy Sherman, p. 43-44)

Art in Focus

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New York