411
411

PROPERTY SOLD WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART TO BENEFIT ACQUISITION FUNDS

A Very Fine Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Dressing Table, Philadelphia, Circa 1770
Estimación
100.000200.000
Lote. Vendido 182,500 USD (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE
411

PROPERTY SOLD WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART TO BENEFIT ACQUISITION FUNDS

A Very Fine Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Dressing Table, Philadelphia, Circa 1770
Estimación
100.000200.000
Lote. Vendido 182,500 USD (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana: Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Porcelain, Prints and Carpets including property sold by the Philadelphia Museum of Art

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New York

A Very Fine Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Dressing Table, Philadelphia, Circa 1770

Procedencia

The Scott family of Philadelphia to Lewis Allaire Scott (1810-1896) and Frances “Fanny” Anna Wistar (1835-1913), daughter of Richard (1790-1863) and Hannah Wistar (1795-1863);
To their son, Alexander Harvey Scott (1867-1940), who married Helen Strothers (1881-1963), daughter of John and Virginia Strothers;
To his wife, Helen Scott at his death;
Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1963-102-1, Bequest of Mrs. Alexander H. Scott, 1963

Documentación

The Magazine Antiques (May 1965): 596

Nota del catálogo

Dressing tables served as the companion piece to a high chest of drawers in the well-appointed Colonial bedchamber and customarily stored the requisites for grooming. Inventory references indicate the top was usually kept covered with a cloth while the drawers often housed powder boxes, brushes, essences, pins and paints. Displaying the additional refinements of quarter columns, a shell drawer, leaf carving on the knees of all four legs, and claw-and-ball feet, this one represents the most expensive variation of the form available in Philadelphia during the Rococo period. It has a history in the Scott family of Philadelphia and descended to Alexander Harvey Scott (1867-1940), the son of Lewis Allaire Scott (1810-1896), a lawyer, and Fanny Wistar (1835-1913), daughter of Richard (1790-1863) and Hannah Wistar (1795-1863). A.H. Scott’s wife, Helen (Strothers) Scott (1881-1963), bequested it to the Philadelphia Museum of Art after her death in 1963.

Exceptional for its bold design, highly figured choice mahogany, and fine condition, this one derives its character from the exuberant Rococo carved decoration. On the shell-carved drawer, the carver manipulated the outer edge of the shell’s articulated fluting into a ruffle that hugs the enclosing circle and centered it with an acanthus flourish, The sinuous leafage that flanks the shell and the symmetrical spread of foliate carving seen at the shell’s lower edge, combine in easy rhythm. The elegantly skirt is shaped with scallops while the knees are densely carved with acanthus leafage, which almost extends down the leg to the claw feet.

This dressing table appears to have been produced in the same unidentified shop as an important group of Philadelphia high chests and dressing tables with very similar carved details. These include a high chest at Winterthur from the Turner family, a high chest in the Karolik Collection owned by Judge Stacy Potts of Trenton, New Jersey, and a matching high chest at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and dressing table at the Baltimore Museum of Art that belonged to Joseph Moulder of Philadelphia (see Joseph Downs, American Furniture, Queen Anne and Chippendale Periods, New York, 1952, no. 195, Edwin Hipkiss, Eighteenth-Century American Arts, Boston, 1950, no. 33, Morrison Heckscher, American Furniture in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1985, no. 165 and William Voss Elder and Jayne Stokes, American Furniture, 1680-1880, from the Collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, 1987, no. 63). A closely related shell carved drawer and claw feet are exhibited on a dressing table from this group at Bayou Bend with a history in the Percival, Zantzinger, and Helmuth families (see David Warren, et al, American Decorative Arts and Paintings in the Bayou Bend Collection, Houston, 1998, F128, p. 78).

For other Philadelphia dressing tables with related details, see one sold at Neal Auctions, December 6-7, 2008, lot 413, one sold at Sotheby’s, Important Americana, September 2008, lot 43, and one sold at Northeast Actions, July 31-August 2, 2009, lot 502.

Important Americana: Furniture, Folk Art, Silver, Porcelain, Prints and Carpets including property sold by the Philadelphia Museum of Art

|
New York