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A Russian Porcelain Soup Plate and Condiment Spoon from Her Majesty Elizaveta Petrovna's Own Service, Imperial Porcelain Manufactory, St. Petersburg, 1756-early 1760s
Estimación
20.00030.000
Lote. Vendido 35,000 USD (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE
1
A Russian Porcelain Soup Plate and Condiment Spoon from Her Majesty Elizaveta Petrovna's Own Service, Imperial Porcelain Manufactory, St. Petersburg, 1756-early 1760s
Estimación
20.00030.000
Lote. Vendido 35,000 USD (Precio de adjudicación con prima del comprador)
SALTAR AL LOTE

Details & Cataloguing

Property from the Collections of Lily & Edmond J. Safra - Volumes I-VI

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A Russian Porcelain Soup Plate and Condiment Spoon from Her Majesty Elizaveta Petrovna's Own Service, Imperial Porcelain Manufactory, St. Petersburg, 1756-early 1760s
the soup plate circular with a scalloped border, decorated with a molded and gilded trellis pattern, the crossing points with molded blossoms painted pink with yellow centers; the spoon with shovel-shaped bowl and handle with conforming gilded trellis pattern and gilded border
both with black overglaze Imperial double-headed eagles, the soup plate with incised production marks "7. and II"  in the paste
diameter of the plate 10 1/8 in.; length of the spoon 5 1/4 in.
25.7 cm; 13.3 cm
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Procedencia

The Winter Palace, London, 1982 (the soup plate)
Christie's New York, October 5, 1983, lot 500A (the condiment spoon)

Nota del catálogo

Empress Elizaveta Petrovna (reigned 1741-1761), a daughter of Emperor Peter the I of Russia, was a great patroness of the arts and culture in Russia. Her rule saw the founding of such influential institutions as the University of Moscow and the Academy of Arts in St. Petersburg. One of her greatest legacies was the founding of the Imperial Porcelain Manufactory in St. Petersburg in 1744, an institution that has functioned continually to the present day. Early attempts sponsored by her father and her predecessor Anna Ioannovna (reigned 1730-1740) were unsuccesful; only during Elizabeth's reign was the ambition of creating Russian porcelain on Russian soil realized by the Russian scientist Dmitrii Vinogradov (1720-1758). The initial production were small, but delightful, pieces such as cane handles and snuffboxes. It was only in 1756 that Vinogradov and his workers were able to design and construct a kiln large enough to produce all the pieces of a full table service. The factory's first service was Empress Elizabeth's Own (Sobstvennyi) Table and Dessert Service. As Natalia Sipovskaia notes, "each piece and every detail of its decor -- from the molded trellis pattern to each garland of flowers -- was molded and sculpted by hand."  Initially designed for twenty-five persons, it included a great number of soup plates (glubokie tarelki) both with and without lids as well as several sorts of spoons. On this service, see I. Popova and N. Sipovskaia's essays on the factory's earliest services in Shedevry russkogo farfora XVIII veka iz sobraniia galerei "Popov i Ko.,"  Moscow, 2009, pp. 52-53; 56-62. For a comparable condiment spoon in the collection of Kuskovo, see Fragile: Tsarskie stoly i farfor revoliutsionerov, Frankfurt, 2008, cat. no. 7, pp. 81, 386.

Property from the Collections of Lily & Edmond J. Safra - Volumes I-VI

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New York