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SOLD BY ORDER OF NATIONAL HERITAGE - THE MUSEUMS ACTION MOVEMENT

Sold by Order of National Heritage - The Museums Action Movement Dame Elisabeth Frink, D.B.E., R.A.
1930-1993
EASTER HEAD I
Estimate
30,00040,000
LOT SOLD. 108,640 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
98

SOLD BY ORDER OF NATIONAL HERITAGE - THE MUSEUMS ACTION MOVEMENT

Sold by Order of National Heritage - The Museums Action Movement Dame Elisabeth Frink, D.B.E., R.A.
1930-1993
EASTER HEAD I
Estimate
30,00040,000
LOT SOLD. 108,640 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Modern British Art

|
London

Sold by Order of National Heritage - The Museums Action Movement Dame Elisabeth Frink, D.B.E., R.A.
1930-1993
1930-1993
EASTER HEAD I
signed and numbered 2/6
bronze with a coloured patina
height 49.5cm., 19 1/2 in. (excluding base)
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Commissioned from the Artist by National Heritage: The Museums Action Movement, 1989

Exhibited

At each of the museums and galleries winning The Museum of the Year Award, 1989-2001.

Literature

Edward Lucie-Smith, Elisabeth Frink: Sculpture Since 1984 and Drawings, Art Books International, London, 1994, p.188, no.SC41, illustrated (another cast), a detail illustrated in colour, p.68.

Catalogue Note

Executed in 1989 and cast in an edition of six, the present work was commissioned by National Heritage and awarded annually to the Museum of the Year from 1989 to 2001. In 2000-2001 the work was awarded to the British Museum for its outstanding achievements including the opening of new galleries, exhibitions of consistently high standard, and the completion of the Great Court.

Edward Lucie-Smith has observed that the large heads made during the last decade of Frink's life were ''her most purely 'abstract' creations'' (Elisabeth Frink: Sculpture since 1984 and Drawings, Art Books International, 1994, p.67). However, as the author also points out, these heads evolved out of a number of her earlier themes. ''First came the Soldiers' Heads of the mid-1960s... these were followed by heads wearing goggles... Her tendency, however, was to create images which were more mystical and less easily linked to particular events, as with the Easter Heads... The Easter Heads (the reference is not to Easter Island, but to the idea of the Resurrection) have enormous staring eyes, emphasised by different coloured patination... Eyes of this type have been noted as one of the legacies of Romano-Egyptian art to Early Christian and thence to Romanesque sculpture. The fixed stare became an emblem of spirituality, and it is in this sense that Frink continued to use it.'' (ibid.)

In a letter to John Letts at National Heritage, dated 10th April 1989, Dame Elisabeth explains, ''what I have tried to do is one of my heads which has an antique feeling about it but at the same time is completely modern.'' Another letter written later in the month concludes ''It is a fairly wild head, as I explained both ancient and modern. I hope it will appeal - it certainly might frighten a few people. But I like it''.

 

 

Modern British Art

|
London