683
683
A LARGE LONDON DELFTWARE BLUE-DASH TULIP AND CARNATION CHARGER
CIRCA 1660-70
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 93,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
683
A LARGE LONDON DELFTWARE BLUE-DASH TULIP AND CARNATION CHARGER
CIRCA 1660-70
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 93,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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New York

A LARGE LONDON DELFTWARE BLUE-DASH TULIP AND CARNATION CHARGER
CIRCA 1660-70
painted in yellow, ochre, blue and green with tulips and carnations issuing from a fenced mound, within a wide border of pomegranates and bi-coloured oak leaves
diameter 16 1/8 in
40.1 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

British Antique Dealers Association, bearing label
Collection of Cecil Baring, 3rd Lord Revelstoke (1864-1934)
Property from the Revelstoke Collection, by the order of the Lambay estate, sold, Sotheby's London, December 3, 2013, lot 39
Vogel Collection no. 828

Catalogue Note

The painting style of the leaves and flowers bear striking similarities to a charger in the Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge, which could perhaps have been painted by the same hand. The charger in the Glaisher collection bears the date 1668 and flanks a central vase issuing tulips and carnations, illustrated by Louis L. Lipski and Michael Archer, Dated English Delftware, Tin-glazed Earthenware 1600-1800, London, 1984, p. 29, no. 53; and Michael Archer, Delftware in the Fitzwilliam Museum, London, 201;3, p. 36, A.53, where the author notes that eight chargers are recorded with flowers issuing from vases. A second charger painted in this manner, also dated 1668, with a 'sun-face' to the central flower is in the Weldon Collection, illustrated by Peter Williams and Pat Halfpenny, A Passion for Pottery, Further selections from the Henry H. Weldon Collection, New York, 2000, pp. 36-37, no. 2.

The trumpet shape device seen at the center of the present dish and the abovementioned examples appears on another that was sold from the contents of Lancotbury Manor at Sworders, Stansted, September 24, 2008, lot 1091. The same design, though slightly different, appears on a charger dated 1676, illustrated by Lipski and Archer, ibid, p. 31, no. 66.

The motif of alternating pomegranates and bi-coloured oak-leaves seen on the present dish features on the earliest known dated English Delftware dish painted with tulips at the center. The dish, dated 1661, inscribed with W over W S is also in the Glaisher collection, illustrated by Lipski and Archer, ibid, p. 38, no. 37; and Archer, ibid, pp. 33-34, A.50. Such motifs derived from 16th century Italian Maiolica which was a prevalent style of workshops in the pottery making centers of Venice and Montelupo. Once exported to Northern Europe these wares then influenced Netherlandish potters in centers such as Haarlem. The same border appears on a London Delftware 'Royal Oak' charger formerly in the Simon Sainsbury Collection, sold, Christie's, London, June 18, 2008, lot 74.

Between 1912 and 1934, the banker, Cecil Baring, 3rd Lord Revelstoke, assembled a large collection of British pottery which included Delftware, slipware, prattware and salt-glaze stoneware. Baring traded with, and took advice from a leading authority of the time, Louis Gautier. Following Baring's death in 1934, a large part of his collection was sold by his son Rupert, 4th Lord Revelstoke, at Puttick & Simpson, London,  November 20-23, 1934 where Gautier bought 104 out of the 861 lots offered for sale.

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York