469
469

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Nikolai Punin and Kazimir Malevich
RUSSIAN
PERVYI TSIKL LEKSII CHITANNYKH NA KRATKOSROCHNYKH KURSAKH DLIA UCHITELEI RISOVANIIA [FIRST CYCLE OF LECTURES GIVEN FOR SHORT COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF DRAWING]. PETROGRAD: IZO NKP, 1920
Estimate
7,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT
469

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Nikolai Punin and Kazimir Malevich
RUSSIAN
PERVYI TSIKL LEKSII CHITANNYKH NA KRATKOSROCHNYKH KURSAKH DLIA UCHITELEI RISOVANIIA [FIRST CYCLE OF LECTURES GIVEN FOR SHORT COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF DRAWING]. PETROGRAD: IZO NKP, 1920
Estimate
7,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Nikolai Punin and Kazimir Malevich
1904-1953 AND 1878-1935
RUSSIAN
PERVYI TSIKL LEKSII CHITANNYKH NA KRATKOSROCHNYKH KURSAKH DLIA UCHITELEI RISOVANIIA [FIRST CYCLE OF LECTURES GIVEN FOR SHORT COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF DRAWING]. PETROGRAD: IZO NKP, 1920
8vo, [limited to between 1500-2000 copies], original pink printed wrapper with two color lithographs by Kazimir Malevich printed in blue, yellow and black
8 1/2 by 5 5/8 in.
21.6 by 14.2 cm
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Literature

Susan Compton, Russian Avant-Garde Books, 1917-34, London: British Library, 1992, p. 128 and plate 15
The Russian Avant-Garde Book 1910-1934, New York: Museum of Modern Art, 2002, p. 306

Catalogue Note

Nikolai Punin (1888-1953) was one of the most articulate Soviet art critics who strongly advocated Constructivism. After the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, Punin edited such important publications as Iskusstvo Kommuny and Izobrazitel'noe iskusstvo. Writing for major Russian periodicals, Punin also joined the Petrograd Visual Arts Department (IZO) of the People's Commissariat of Enlightenment (Narkompros) in 1917. In this series of lectures, delivered in 1919, he condemned the "decadent" art of the past.

From the mid-1920s, Punin had an affair with the famous Russian poet Anna Akhmatova. He was repeatedly investigated and arrested by the Soviet secret police; finally after World War II, in 1949, he was arrested and sent to Siberia, where he died at Vorkuta in 1953.

The front and back cover of the book feature Suprematist designs by the Russian avant-garde artist Kazimir Malevich; they exemplify his experiments in non-objective art. 

Russian Art

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