389
389
Joseph Dionysius Odevaere
NARCISSUS
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 93,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
389
Joseph Dionysius Odevaere
NARCISSUS
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 93,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Master Paintings and Sculpture: Part II

|
New York

Joseph Dionysius Odevaere
BRUGES 1778- 1830 BRUSSELS
NARCISSUS

Provenance

Paul Duvivier, Paris, 1925;
Thence by descent.

Exhibited

Paris, Salon, 1820, no. 106 (where called Narcisse se mirant dans l’eau. Figures de grandeur naturelle);
Brussels, Musée Royal des Beaux-Arts, David et son temps, 1925, no. 68.

Literature

L. Marie de Bast, Annales du Salon de Gand et de l’école moderne des Pays-Bas, Gand 1823, p. 22;
David et son temps, exhibition catalogue, Brussels 1925, p. 18, cat. no. 68. 

Catalogue Note

Engraved: Pierre-Jean de Vlamynck (1795-1850) (see fig. 1).

A student of Joseph Benoît Suvée and Jacques Louis David, the Belgian artist Odevaere was renowned for his meticulous draftsmanship and theatrical compositions. Odevaere received his training at the Academy of Bruges, after which time he moved to Paris to work in Joseph-Benoît Suvée's studio, and then finally on to Jacques Louis David's, where he entered in 1801. Odevaere ingratiated himself with the French artistic community, no doubt through his connections to David, for whom he assisted on his second version of the Coronation of Napolean in Versailles. Along with Joseph Ruxthiel (1775-1837), Odevaere was the only Belgian painter to be awarded the first grand prize of the Prix de Rome, for which his Death of Phocion (Paris, National School of Fine Arts) was the winning entry. Odevaere's later style, to which this Narcissus belongs, is clearly indedbted to the Italian Renaissance and antiquity, no doubt developed during his sojourn to Italy towards the end of 1805. 

Master Paintings and Sculpture: Part II

|
New York