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Details & Cataloguing

Style: Private Collections

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London

A Louis XIV gilt-bronze mounted première-partie brass and turtleshell Boulle marquetry and ebony commode, circa 1710
the top depicting the Triumph of Bacchus, above four drawers decorated in the style of Bérain, later feet and handles
83cm. high, 128cm. wide, 65.5cm. deep; 2ft. 8 3/4 in., 4ft. 2 1/2 in., 2ft. 1 3/4 in.
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Catalogue Note

This present commode is part of a group of similar furniture pieces dating from around 1700-1720 and traditionally attributed to the ébéniste Nicolas Sageot (1666-1731). In Sageot's times, stamps were still a rarity, and are therefore rarely conclusive as regards to the actual maker of a piece, which was the product of several artisans: carpenters for the carcass, marqueteurs and bronziers

Furthermore, it was not unusual for marchand-ébénistes such as Sageot or Gérard to provide marqueteurs with raw materials that would be returned in the form of panels ready to be fitted on to the carcass of the piece. Some of the larger panels could, in effect, be interchangeable; for example, those normally found on the armoires are also found on the sides of most commodes.

The top of the present commode is particularly rare among contemporary examples, which were then typically designed after drawings by Jean Berain: gently rounded, the central scene represents the Triumph of Bacchus, a subject popularized in the 1620s by Diego Velázquez and then re-appropriated by painters such as Nicolas Poussin and Francesco Albani. The top of a commode recently on the French market is almost identical to the present example, however in contre partie

Interestingly, the front-drawer marquetry with the dragon-like creatures is nearly identical to that found on the commode aforementioned and on another sold Sotheby's London, 15 June 1990, lot 6.

Style: Private Collections

|
London