80
80

PROPERTY OF A DIRECT DESCENDENT

AN AMERICAN SILVER LARGE COFFEE POT, JOSEPH & NATHANIEL RICHARDSON, PHILADELPHIA, CIRCA 1785-90
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 15,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
80

PROPERTY OF A DIRECT DESCENDENT

AN AMERICAN SILVER LARGE COFFEE POT, JOSEPH & NATHANIEL RICHARDSON, PHILADELPHIA, CIRCA 1785-90
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 15,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana

|
New York

AN AMERICAN SILVER LARGE COFFEE POT, JOSEPH & NATHANIEL RICHARDSON, PHILADELPHIA, CIRCA 1785-90
with beaded borders, fluted and leaf-capped spout, and pineapple finial, one side engraved with contemporary initials AM within bright-cut oval hung from a ribbon-bow and between crossed palms
marked twice on base I [pellet] NR conjoined in rectangle
height 14 1/4 in.
36.2 cm
40 oz 5 dwt gross
1256 g
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Ann Waln (1760-1814) of Philadelphia, m. Thomas Morgan (1760-1804), to their daughter
Susan Waln Morgan (1801-1871), m. Benjamin Rodman (1794-1876) of New Bedford, Mass., to their daughter
Elizabeth Rodman (1821-1876), m. Francis Minot Weld (1817-1900) of Boston, to their daughter
Cora Weld (1848-1914), m. 1872 Rev. Francis Greenwood Peabody (1847-1936), to their daughter
Gertrude Weld Peabody (1877-1938) of Cambridge Mass., to her niece
Gertrude Peabody (1910-1967) of Boston, then by descent to the present owner

Catalogue Note

Ann Waln was one of six surviving children of Robert Waln and Rebecca Coffin.  Her father was born on the Waln plantation in Northern Liberties, Philadelphia, and was a successful merchant with a fleet of ships; he signed the non-importation resolutions of 1765.  He died in 1782, leaving bequests to his wife and children, and one for supporting a free negro school.  Ann's brother Robert continued the family business and later built a cotton factory at Trenton, New Jersey.

Ann Waln married Thomas Morgan, also of Philadelphia.  Both Ann and Thomas died fairly young, leaving their son Charles W. Morgan as head of the family by the time he was 22.  His sister Rebecca married William R. Rodman of New Bedford in 1813; at the wedding Charles met Sarah Rodman, whom he married in 1819, and in 1820 Charles and Rebecca's sister Susan married Benjamin Rodman, triply linking the two families.

Important Americana

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New York