1509
1509

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF ADELAIDE DE MENIL AND EDMUND CARPENTER

RARE SHAKER PINE AND MAPLE MEETING HOUSE TRESTLE TABLE, WATERVLIET, NEW YORK, CIRCA 1830
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 16,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
1509

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF ADELAIDE DE MENIL AND EDMUND CARPENTER

RARE SHAKER PINE AND MAPLE MEETING HOUSE TRESTLE TABLE, WATERVLIET, NEW YORK, CIRCA 1830
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 16,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana

|
New York

RARE SHAKER PINE AND MAPLE MEETING HOUSE TRESTLE TABLE, WATERVLIET, NEW YORK, CIRCA 1830

Provenance

Celeste and Edward Koster Antiques, Chatham, New York.

Catalogue Note

Measuring 9 feet in length, this trestle table follows the design of tables made at the Shaker community in Watervliet, New York. Closely related tables made in Watervliet include one of cherrywood and curly maple and another of maple and pine both illustrated in Timothy Rieman and Jean Burks, The Encyclopedia of Shaker Furniture (Atglen, PA” Schiffer Publishing, 2003): p. 231, fig. 320 and fig. 322, p. 232. The tables display the like details of a top with rounded or beveled edges and vertical uprights that are rectangular in cross section and shaped like pilasters. The latter were made with shaped bases and capitals, in order to add stability to the arched feet and cross members above. The longitudinal stretcher on the tables is dropped somewhat below the top and tenoned through the uprights and fastened with two heavy dowel pins.

In 1812, the use of dining tables of this type at Watervliet was described by Thomas Brown, who was a member of the community there: “The brethren and sisters generally eat at the same time at two long tables placed in the kitchen, men at one and women at the other; during which time they sit on benches, and are all silent. They go to their meals walking in order, one directly after the other; the head of the family or Elder, takes the lead of the men, and one called Elder Sister takes the lead of the women. Several women are employed in cooking and waiting on the table – they are commonly relieved weekly by others.”1

1 Timothy Rieman and Jean Burks, The Encyclopedia of Shaker Furniture (Atglen, PA” Schiffer Publishing, 2003), p. 232.

Important Americana

|
New York