2127
2127

PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK COLLECTOR

James K. Polk
TWO AUTOGRAPH LETTERS SIGNED ("JAMES K. POLK") AS ELEVENTH PRESIDENT, TO SECRETARY OF WAR WILLIAM S. MARCY, REGARDING THE MEXICAN WAR
Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 8,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
2127

PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK COLLECTOR

James K. Polk
TWO AUTOGRAPH LETTERS SIGNED ("JAMES K. POLK") AS ELEVENTH PRESIDENT, TO SECRETARY OF WAR WILLIAM S. MARCY, REGARDING THE MEXICAN WAR
Estimate
6,0008,000
LOT SOLD. 8,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

|
New York

James K. Polk
TWO AUTOGRAPH LETTERS SIGNED ("JAMES K. POLK") AS ELEVENTH PRESIDENT, TO SECRETARY OF WAR WILLIAM S. MARCY, REGARDING THE MEXICAN WAR
One page bifolium (10 x 8 in.; 255 x 203 mm), [Washington], 14 May 1847, giving Marcy instructions regarding a joint resolution of Congress to be sent to General Zachary Taylor and his officers and troops; a few very small marginal tears and fold separations. — One page on blue ruled paper (9 5/8 x 7 3/4 in.; 245 x 198 mm), [Washington], 27 December 1848, requesting information from Marcy in order to finish a response to a resolution put forth by the House of Representatives.
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Provenance

Sotheby's New York, 21 June 2007, lot 71

Catalogue Note

Polk in the midst of the Mexican War. In the first letter Polk writes to Secretary of War William Marcy: "I have to request that you will cause the accompanying letters — and authenticated copies of the joint resolution of Congress 'giving the thanks of Congress — to Major General Taylor; and the officers and men under his command in the the late military operations at Monterey'; be enveloped and addressed respectively to those officers. — When enveloped return them to me, that I may place my frank upon them, before they are placed in the mail." Taylor won a significant victory at the Battle of Monterey on 24 September 1846.

Polk was a successful one-term president, negotiating with Britain to divide the disputed Northwest, (adding Idaho, Washington and Oregon to the Union), and, through victory in the Mexican War and subsequent purchases, adding 1.2 million square miles of the American Southwest. However, these significant territorial gains resurrected the question of whether slavery would be allowed in federal territories. The contentious debates in Congress, and throughout the nation, would lead eventually to Civil War.

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

|
New York