2126
2126
John Tyler
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED ("JOHN TYLER"), AS TENTH PRESIDENT, TO DANIEL WEBSTER, DISPUTING LORD ASHBURTON'S CLAIM THAT THE WEBSTER–ASHBURTON TREATY ESTABLISHED A RIGHT TO SEARCH AMERICAN SHIPS ON THE HIGH SEAS
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 3,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
2126
John Tyler
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED ("JOHN TYLER"), AS TENTH PRESIDENT, TO DANIEL WEBSTER, DISPUTING LORD ASHBURTON'S CLAIM THAT THE WEBSTER–ASHBURTON TREATY ESTABLISHED A RIGHT TO SEARCH AMERICAN SHIPS ON THE HIGH SEAS
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 3,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

|
New York

John Tyler
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED ("JOHN TYLER"), AS TENTH PRESIDENT, TO DANIEL WEBSTER, DISPUTING LORD ASHBURTON'S CLAIM THAT THE WEBSTER–ASHBURTON TREATY ESTABLISHED A RIGHT TO SEARCH AMERICAN SHIPS ON THE HIGH SEAS
Two pages (9 3/4 x 7 7/8 in.; 247 x 202 mm) on a single leaf, Charles City County, Virginia, 22 May 1843; Neatly inlaid to a larger sheet, scattered creasing, one pinhole. 
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Catalogue Note

President John Tyler here writes to his former Secretary of State Daniel Webster, who had resigned from Tyler’s cabinet under pressure from fellow Whigs two weeks earlier:

“I have read and now return the private dispatches with which you favored me from Mr. [Edward] Everett and your letter in reply. Lord Ashburton must certainly be under great mistake in relation to what passed between you on the right of visit and of search. Most certainly but one language has been held in all our Cabinet consultations, which was uniformly in negative of any such right.”

The Webster–Ashburton Treaty of 1842 resolved a number of issues between the United States and Britain’s Canadian colonies. It settled the nonviolent “Aroostook War” over the Maine–New Brunswick border, agreed to borders and shared use of the Great Lakes, reaffirmed the 49th parallel border in the western frontier up to the Rocky Mountains. It also defined crimes subject to extradition, and called for a final end to the slave trade on the high seas. The British negotiators had wanted to make a “right of search and visit” part of the treaty but its final language failed to establish such a new right in international maritime law.

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

|
New York