2002
2002

PROPERTY FROM THE DAVY CROCKETT COLLECTION OF DAVID ZUCKER

Crockett, David
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED ("DAVID CROCKETT") TO HIROM S. FAVOR, COMPLAINING ABOUT PRESIDENT ANDREW JACKSON
Estimate
30,00040,000
LOT SOLD. 30,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
2002

PROPERTY FROM THE DAVY CROCKETT COLLECTION OF DAVID ZUCKER

Crockett, David
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED ("DAVID CROCKETT") TO HIROM S. FAVOR, COMPLAINING ABOUT PRESIDENT ANDREW JACKSON
Estimate
30,00040,000
LOT SOLD. 30,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

|
New York

Crockett, David
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED ("DAVID CROCKETT") TO HIROM S. FAVOR, COMPLAINING ABOUT PRESIDENT ANDREW JACKSON
2 pages (9 3/4 x 8 in.; 243 x 202 mm) on a single leaf, "Washington City," 9 April 1834; mounting remnant at left margin, a couple of fold separations with early repairs. Framed with double-sided Plexiglas.
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Provenance

William F. Gable, of Altoona, Pennsylvania (American Art Association, 3 December 1923, lot 241)

Catalogue Note

An exceptional political letter by Congressman Davy Crockett, deprecating the autocratic rule of Andrew Jackson, of whom he was an adherent during the early part of his political career. 

After acknowledging Favor's recent letter, Crockett discusses his plans to tour parts of the nation that are unfamiliar to him: "You state that you have herd that I intended visiting the eastern States at the Close of Congress, I have had a desire to travel through your country mearly for Curiosity and have been raised entirely in a frontier country and that it is natural for me to have a desire to become acquainted with the Customs and habits of your Country as I expect they are greatly different from my native Country You may rest assured if I do come that I will take great pleasure in calling on you as I will be an entire Stranger to every person I meet and will have to forme my acquaintance as I go—tho I wish you not to misunderstand me I may not come[.]" What Crockett thought of as Favor's country was probably Boston. Favor was a publisher and native of Eastport, Maine; in 1849 he established Favor’s Express, and a popular postal express company with headquarters in Boston and branches in Eastport, Portland, and St. John.

The tenor of the letter changes sharply when Crockett turns his pen to a discussion of the incumbent Jackson administration. "I am getting anxious to get home and see no hopes of doing any good by Staying here the house of representatives have determined by a majority that Andrew Jackson shall Wield both sword and purse his will is to be the law of the land If this what is called republicanism good God deliver us from all such doctrine[.]"

Fine Manuscript and Printed Americana

|
New York