588
588
Carl von Blaas
AUSTRIAN
THE PRINCE OF VALMONTONE WITH THE DONNA GWENDALINA DORIA PAMPHILI AND BERTRAM TALBOT IN A VILLA GARDEN 
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
588
Carl von Blaas
AUSTRIAN
THE PRINCE OF VALMONTONE WITH THE DONNA GWENDALINA DORIA PAMPHILI AND BERTRAM TALBOT IN A VILLA GARDEN 
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

19th Century European Art

|
New York

Carl von Blaas
1815-1894
AUSTRIAN
THE PRINCE OF VALMONTONE WITH THE DONNA GWENDALINA DORIA PAMPHILI AND BERTRAM TALBOT IN A VILLA GARDEN 
signed C. Blaas. pinse., dated 1851 and inscribed Il Principe di Valmontone età sua 8 anni/ Donna Gwendalina/ Doria Pamphili età 5/ Bertram Talbot/ età 19/ Roma (center left)
oil on canvas
59 by 72 in.
150 by 182.9 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

The Valmontone Family 
Thence by descent through the family 
Trosby Galleries, Palm Beach
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Perry, Jr. (and sold, Sotheby's, New York, February 29, 1984, lot 9, illustrated)
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Catalogue Note

Carl von Blaas was an Austrian history, portrait and genre painter and the father of Eugen von Blaas (see lots 418 and 436). He was a professor at the Vienna Academy and in 1877, after completing a series of frescoes for the Arsenal in Vienna, he was elected to hereditary nobility by Emperor Franz Joseph I.

The little girl in the present lot is Gwendalina Doria Pamphili (b. 1846). Her brother, Giovanni-Andrea, the Prince of Valmontone (b. 1843), stands to her right in red. Both children are distantly related to the older, seated boy, Bertram Talbot, the future 17th Earl of Shrewsbury, through their mother, the daughter of the 16th Earl of Shrewsbury. This painting is a representation of the consolidation of power between two prominent nineteenth century families. Set on the hilltop city of Valmontone, the composition features Rome and St. Peter’s Basilica in the distance, evocative of both the power these two families joined together and their strong devotion to the Catholic church. 

19th Century European Art

|
New York