504
504
Daniel Ridgway Knight
AMERICAN
DAYDREAMING
Estimate
30,00040,000
JUMP TO LOT
504
Daniel Ridgway Knight
AMERICAN
DAYDREAMING
Estimate
30,00040,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

19th Century European Art

|
New York

Daniel Ridgway Knight
1839-1924
AMERICAN
DAYDREAMING
signed Ridgway Knight and indistinctly inscribed Paris (lower right) 
oil on canvas 
32 by 25 3/4 in.
81.3 by 64.1 cm
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Howard L. Rehs has confirmed the authenticity of this work and will include it in his forthcoming catalogue raisonné which will be published by Rehs Galleries -  www.ridgwayknight.com.

Provenance

Sale: Sotheby's, New York, June 3, 1971, lot 18, illustrated 
Private Collection 
Thence by descent to the present owner 

Catalogue Note

By the mid-1890s, Daniel Ridgway Knight established a contract with Knoedler which enabled the painter to sell his entire output through the famed art dealer, except for those he wished to sell privately on his own. Around the same time the artist also decided to purchase a third residence in Rolleboise, the likely setting of the present work. At this new home in the country, Ridgway Knight created an environment resembling the times prior to the industrial revolution. He never installed electricity or a bathroom with running water in the house. The purpose of this setting was to enhance and support his sole dedication to painting.

The house was "situated near the top of a high bluff overlooking the village and a bend of the Seine. The view was startlingly beautiful, stretching over cascading rooftops, the river, and miles and miles of fields, meadows, and lines of trees all the way to the horizon" (R. B. Knight, Ridgway Knight: A Master of the Pastoral Genre, exh. cat., Cornell University, 1989, p. 4). Also on his property was a glass structure, likely built as a greenhouse, in which the artist could stage his models in a certain light with the backdrop of the countryside but be protected from the elements (fig. 1). This allowed Ridgway Knight to create such beautifully observed portraits of figures in landscapes, such as Daydreaming. 

19th Century European Art

|
New York