401
401

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, UNITED STATES

Alexandre Cabanel
FRENCH
LA NAISSANCE DE VÉNUS
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 175,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
401

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, UNITED STATES

Alexandre Cabanel
FRENCH
LA NAISSANCE DE VÉNUS
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 175,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

19th Century European Art

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New York

Alexandre Cabanel
1823 - 1889
FRENCH
LA NAISSANCE DE VÉNUS
signed ALEX. CABANEL (lower left); inscribed a mon ami Emilie Pacini and signed A Cabanel (on the reverse)
oil on panel
9 1/2 by 17 3/8 in.; 24.1 by 44.1 cm
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Provenance

Émilie-Thérèse Paton, Paris (née Pacini, according to an inscription on the reverse)
Léon Comerre and Jacqueline Comerre-Paton (by descent from the above, her mother) 
Denise Lion-Comerre (by descent from the above, her grandparents, and sold, Drouot-Richelieu, Paris, February 3, 2003, lot 318, illustrated)
Acquired at the above sale

Literature

Jean Nougaret, "Catalogue sommaire de l'oeuvre peint d'Alexandre Cabanel," Alexandre Cabanel 1823-1889: La tradition du beau, exh. cat., Musée Fabre, Paris; Wallraf-Richartz-Museum, Cologne, 2010, p. 459, no. 172 (as location unknown)

Catalogue Note

A pupil of François-Edouard Picot, Alexandre Cabanel was one of the leading academic artists of the nineteenth century, along with William Bouguereau and Jean-Léon Gérôme. The present lot, completed in 1863, is a study for Cabanel’s masterpiece of the same year, La naissance de Vénus, now in the collection of the Musée d’Orsay (fig. 1). The finished work was well-received at the Salon des Artistes Français in 1863, where it was purchased by Napoleon III. Cabanel adapted the classic mythological scene of the birth of Venus, the Roman goddess of love, beauty and fertility, which has inspired countless artists since the Renaissance. Eroticized with her sensual pose and cascading red hair, Venus was undoubtedly inspired by Odalisque à l’esclave (1842, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, fig. 2) by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, acknowledged in the mid-nineteenth century as the grand master of not only history and mythological painting but also of the female nude (Lisa Small, "Naissance de Vénus," Alexandre Cabanel 1823-1889: La tradition du beau, exh. cat., Musée Fabre, Paris; Wallraf-Richartz-Museum, Cologne, 2010, p. 212).

The present lot is dedicated to Émilie-Thérèse Paton (née Pacini), a French novelist and playwright, who previously sat for Cabanel. The work entered the collection of the painter Léon Comerre by way of his wife, Paton’s daughter Jacqueline, where it remained until recently.

19th Century European Art

|
New York