Lot 308
  • 308

TIFFANY STUDIOS | "Aventurine Lava" Vase from the Collection of Louis Comfort Tiffany

Estimate
25,000 - 35,000 USD
Sold
bidding is closed

Description

  • Tiffany Studios
  • "Aventurine Lava" Vase from the Collection of Louis Comfort Tiffany
  • engraved L.C. Tiffany Favrile 13A-Coll
  • favrile glass
  • 5 3/8  in. (13.7 cm) high
  • circa 1910

Provenance

Collection of Louis Comfort Tiffany, Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow, New York
Private Collection
Private Collection, Connecticut
Lillian Nassau, New York
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Catalogue Note

Louis C. Tiffany’s proudest artistic achievement was probably the creation of Favrile glass.  He loved it in all the multitude of ways his companies utilized the material, but none more so than the blown glass vases.  In his 1914 ghost-written autobiography, he claimed that it was these objects, and not his leaded glass windows, that brought him his greatest fame.  Tiffany extolled that the vases were “distinguished by certain remarkable shapes and brilliant and deeply toned colors, usually iridescent like the wings of certain American butterflies, the necks of pigeons and peacocks, the wing-covers of various beetles.”

No piece better exemplifies how truly remarkable blown Favrile pieces can be than the Aventurine Lava vase offered here.  The transparent yellow body, of classic proportions and with a gold iridescence, is decorated with an irregularly dripped band of sparkling green aventurine glass in varying thicknesses.  Marvered into the recesses formed by the green overlay are small bits of crushed iridescent gold glass, a decorative technique that is likely unique to this object. 

It is no wonder why Louis C. Tiffany selected this vase to be in his personal collection, as signified by the A-Coll inscription on its base.  It is a breathtakingly beautiful masterpiece, brilliantly conceived and executed.  The vase was recognized as such by Tiffany himself and it is still clearly evident in the approximately 100 years after it was created. 

—Paul Doros
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