4
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PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

Anders Zorn
SWEDISH
WOMEN OUTSIDE THE SIDI ABDERRAHMAN MOSQUE, ALGIERS
Estimate
300,000500,000
LOT SOLD. 309,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
4

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

Anders Zorn
SWEDISH
WOMEN OUTSIDE THE SIDI ABDERRAHMAN MOSQUE, ALGIERS
Estimate
300,000500,000
LOT SOLD. 309,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Orientalist Sale

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London

Anders Zorn
1860 - 1920
SWEDISH
WOMEN OUTSIDE THE SIDI ABDERRAHMAN MOSQUE, ALGIERS
signed and dated Sidi Abderaman Algier / Mars 87 / Zorn lower right
watercolour and gouache on paper
45.5 by 28.5cm., 18 by 11¼in.
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Provenance

Sir Ernest Cassel, London (1852-1921; Prussian-born banker to Edward VII, Herbert Asquith and Winston Churchill, art collector and philanthropist, whose portrait Zorn painted in England)
Private collection, England

Literature

Gerda Boëthius, Anders Zorn-Tecknaren, Malaren, Etsaren, Skulptören, Stockholm, 1949, p. 542, listed (as Sidi Abderramoskén)

Catalogue Note

This rediscovered work, executed in March 1887, belongs to the small series of watercolours Zorn made in Algiers, during an extensive journey with his wife Emma to Constantinople, Greece, Italy, and North Africa. Predating Zorn's work in oil, a medium he first explored later that year in Cornwall, it shows his mastery and virtuosity in the medium of watercolour which first brought him fame.

Zorn depicts the Sidi Abderrahman Mosque in Algiers, Algeria. According to Cook’s Practical Guide to Algiers, Algeria, and Tunisia (1904), 'With the exception of the Djama el Kebir…this is the oldest religious building in Algiers…. The marabout [popular saint] Abd er Rahman et Thalebi was born in 1387 and died in 1471. The mosque was built between these dates and contains his tomb, over which are hung silk banners, ostrich eggs, etc., and on which lights are kept burning.' Auguste Renoir had painted a very similar view of the Abderrahman mosque five years earlier, in 1882.

The watercolour's first owner was the German-born, London-based banker and industrialist Ernest Cassel, one of Zorn's earliest and most important patrons during his London years (1881-87), and whose introductions to members of high society led to numerous portrait commissions on both sides of the Channel, including Cassel's own (fig. 1). It is possible that the present work, which would have held sentimental value to Zorn having been made during his honeymoon, was a gift to Cassel in recognition of his unwavering support.

The Orientalist Sale

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London