38
38
A Swiss gold openface quarter repeating clockwatch, retailed by Chaudron, Philadelphia, circa 1801
Estimate
10,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
38
A Swiss gold openface quarter repeating clockwatch, retailed by Chaudron, Philadelphia, circa 1801
Estimate
10,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Gallison Hall: The James F. Scott Collection

|
New York

A Swiss gold openface quarter repeating clockwatch, retailed by Chaudron, Philadelphia, circa 1801
cylinder movement with going barrel, the bridge pierced with the initials of the maker C&H, the back plate signed Chaudron, the hinged gilt-metal dust cap with presentation inscription, white enamel dial with blued steel hands with gold tips, with winding holes for going and striking, a lever at three o’clock for NON SONNE and SONNE, plain gold case with molded borders
the front movement plate numbered 4603, the case with the makers mark incuse II RI conjoined and numbered  17956, the bell scratched 4475  deleted) and 4603, also scratched with two names F.L Webar above Matthews nov? 1848 (probably names of repairers).
diameter 2 3/8 in.
6 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Property of the Carr family, descendants if Samuel Carr
Sotheby's New York, January 30, 1986, lot 406

Exhibited

Bayou Bend, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 1973-1986

Catalogue Note

The initials decoratively pierced in the bridge above the balance are probably those of David Courvoisier et Jacques Frederic Houriet of Le Locle, working circa 1775-1804.

The inscription reads “FROM Thomas Jefferson to Samuel Carr”

This watch was given by Jefferson to his nephew Samuel Carr about 1801. It can almost certainly be identified with an entry in Jefferson’s accounts dated February 21, 1801, from one of Jefferson’s agents for payment for “Mr. Chaudron gold watch $175.” Samuel Carr was the son of Dabney Carr the patriot and his wife Martha, sister of Thomas Jefferson. Dabney was born in 1744 and died in Charlottesville in 1773, at the age of 30. He was a close friend of Thomas Jefferson from childhood and was buried in what became the family cemetery at Monticello. Jefferson took in his widowed sister and her children at Monticello and supervised their education. Samuel attended William and Mary College, became a lawyer like his father and was appointed Magistrate of Albemarle County in 1806.

He inherited his uncle Samuel's estate Dunlora where Jefferson designed a house for him and his bride about 1795. He became a Colonel in the Virginia Militia and commanded the U.S. cavalry at Norfolk in 1812. He died in 1855. The watch descended through James L. Carr (1811-75), his son John O. Carr (1841-1920), his eldest child Annie Carr Lumm (1874-1962) to the Carr family, consignors at the 1986 auction.

Gallison Hall: The James F. Scott Collection

|
New York