16
16
A GILT-BRONZE ALTAR STAND TANG DYNASTY
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
16
A GILT-BRONZE ALTAR STAND TANG DYNASTY
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Junkunc: Chinese Buddhist Sculpture

|
New York

A GILT-BRONZE ALTAR STAND TANG DYNASTY
the rectangular pedestal supported on high corner legs joined by struts with barbed aprons, the front corners with balustrades set with lotus-bud finials, enclosing two muscular lokapalas flanking a central figure of an acolyte or Buddhist monk standing atop a lotus to the center, a fragment of a figure, possibly an apsara, to the central front face, three rectangular apertures that would have originally supported a trinity of principal figures behind, the reverse with later-inscribed dedicatory inscription translating to 'respectfully made by Lin Shide for parents on the 8th day in the 10th month of the 1st year of Xiping during Northern Wei'
Width 6 1/2 in., 16.5 cm
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Provenance

Collection of Stephen Junkunc, III (d. 1978). 

Catalogue Note

This impressive altar stand would have originally supported a Buddhist trinity, flanked by the remaining subsidiary figures. The denticulated cusped platform, muscular rendering of the lokapalas and inclusion of the open balustrades to the corners all suggest a mid to late Tang dynasty attribution. 

A number of extant Tang dynasty altar groups are known, many of which have been subjected to some degree of alteration or replacement to the figures. Two mid-Tang period examples in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco are illustrated in René-Yvon Lefebvre d'Argencé, Chinese, Korean and Japanese Sculpture in The Avery Brundage Collection, Tokyo, 1974, pls 92-93. Compare another altar in the Seattle Asian Art Museum, illustrated in Hugo Munsterberg, Chinese Buddhist Bronzes, Tokyo, 1967, pl. 119, which the author suggests is assembled. 

Junkunc: Chinese Buddhist Sculpture

|
New York