312
312

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF ELSPETH MCCONNELL, MONTREAL

Henri Matisse
FARANDOLE
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 137,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
312

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF ELSPETH MCCONNELL, MONTREAL

Henri Matisse
FARANDOLE
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 137,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Henri Matisse
1869 - 1954
FARANDOLE
Stamped with the initials HM (lower right)
Colored crayon on paper
15 7/8 by 10 1/4 in.
40.3 by 26 cm
Executed in 1938. 
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The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by the late Madame Marguerite Duthuit-Matisse.

Provenance

Waddington Galleries, Montreal
Acquired from the above in 1976

Exhibited

Waddington Galleries, Montreal, Henri Matisse, 1869-1954: Paintings, Drawings, Lithographs, 1976, no. 22, illustrated in the catalogue

Catalogue Note

In 1938, Matisse returned to his most iconic motif and the subject of his 1909 Fauve masterpiece: La Danse. The present work is an extremely rare example from this series, rendered in colored crayon with elegant, hard-edged lines. Executed following the completion of his celebrated mural at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, La Danse II, it displays his dedication to the subject as well as the immense joy he felt in rendering these familiar figures in motion. Matisse wrote to his son about the La Danse II exclaiming "it has a splendour that one can't imagine unless one sees it—because both the whole ceiling and its arched vaults come alive through radiation and the main effect continues right down to the floor... I am profoundly tired but very pleased. When I saw the canvas put in place, it was detached from me and became part of the building" (quoted in Matisse (exhibition catalogue), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1993, n.p.).

Matisse was exhausted by the project itself, but was immensely content with the outcome and continued to revisit the theme. In this act of self-appropriation, Matisse re-contextualizes his own oeuvre. Displaying a modernity ahead of his time, it is widely recognized that Matisse’s dancers were initially inspired by the swirling Shakespearean fairies in British Romantic artist William Blake’s watercolor Oberon, Titania and Puck with Fairies Dancing (see fig. 1). While Matisse’s use of color and championing of the collage method have placed him in the forefront of the art historical canon, it is perhaps this motif which has proved his most lasting and quintessentially recognizable contribution, informing the work of countless contemporary artists (see fig. 2).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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