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Jefferson, Thomas
A MAP OF THE COUNTRY BETWEEN ALBEMARLE SOUND AND LAKE ERIE, COMPREHENDING THE WHOLE OF VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, DELAWARE AND PENSYLVANIA, WITH PARTS OF SEVERAL OTHER OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. ENGRAVED FOR THE NOTES ON VIRGINIA. LONDON: PRINTED FOR JOHN STOCKDALE, 1787
Estimate
18,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 16,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
19
Jefferson, Thomas
A MAP OF THE COUNTRY BETWEEN ALBEMARLE SOUND AND LAKE ERIE, COMPREHENDING THE WHOLE OF VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, DELAWARE AND PENSYLVANIA, WITH PARTS OF SEVERAL OTHER OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. ENGRAVED FOR THE NOTES ON VIRGINIA. LONDON: PRINTED FOR JOHN STOCKDALE, 1787
Estimate
18,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 16,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana, Including Cartography

|
New York

Jefferson, Thomas
A MAP OF THE COUNTRY BETWEEN ALBEMARLE SOUND AND LAKE ERIE, COMPREHENDING THE WHOLE OF VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, DELAWARE AND PENSYLVANIA, WITH PARTS OF SEVERAL OTHER OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. ENGRAVED FOR THE NOTES ON VIRGINIA. LONDON: PRINTED FOR JOHN STOCKDALE, 1787
Engraved map (23 5/8 x 23 1/2 in.; 602 x 597), engraved by Samuel Neele and Guillaume Delahaye, contemporary outline handcoloring. Notes on Virginia, 8vo, full-page woodcut illustration of "Madison's cave" on C8v, folding letterpress table. BINDING: contemporary tree sheep.

Map handsomely framed and glazed with UVIII Plexiglass. A few very short fold separations or repairs at folds, tiny repair to upper left corner, trimmed close at right margin, just catching neatline in a couple of areas. Notes with some light browning, title-page lightly stained and abraded in a spot, folding table with fold separations; binding rubbed and rebacked.


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Literature

Clark 1:262; Degrees of Latitude 72; Morrison, On the Map 44; Vail 760

Catalogue Note

A FINE IMPRESSION OF THE ONLY MAP BY THOMAS JEFFERSON, made for the first English edition of his Notes on the State of Virginia and accompanied by the copy of the book from which this map was removed.

In 1780, the Secretary of the French legation, François Barbé-Marbois, circulated a questionnaire to several members of the Continental Congress regarding the laws, institutions, and topography of the states. When Jefferson left for France in 1785, he took his draft reply with him and arranged to have two hundred copies printed in English for private distribution. A copy ended up in the hands of an unscrupulous French bookseller, Pierre-Théophile Barrois, who "employed a hireling translator and was about publishing it in the most injurious form possible" (TJ Papers 9:265). When Jefferson learned of this, he arranged for Abbé André Morellet to prepare a suitable French translation. It was Morellet who encouraged Jefferson to include a map of Virginia and its neighboring states. Jefferson originally engaged an English engraver, Samuel Neele, to execute the plate, but the results proved disappointing as the map was riddled with errors. Jefferson finally decided upon a French engraver, Guillaume Delahaye, to make the corrections and in March 1786, two hundred and fifty impressions of a French translation were pulled.

John Stockdale, who was also Jefferson's longtime bookseller, wrote on 20 November 1786 to see if Jefferson had any interest in publishing the Notes in English: "Some time past two French Gentlemen call'd upon me, with a Copy of your Minutes of Virginia, with a View to have it Printed, but I inform'd them that I had some reason to believe that a New Edition was coming out with corrections by the Author, and … a large Map was engraving for the Work. I have some doubts wether it would pay the expences, at same time have a Wish to Publish it, with your Name, as I am convinced it is a Work of great Merit" (TJ Papers 10:545). In his reply 8 December 1786, Jefferson ignored Stockdale's proposition, possibly because he was thinking of having an English edition printed by Hoffman's Imprimerie Polytype (see note, TJ Papers 10:587).

On 1 February 1787, Jefferson finalized his negotiations with Stockdale. He writes: "You have two or three times proposed to me the printing my Notes on Virginia. I never did intend to have them made public ... [b]ut as a translation of them is coming out, I have concluded to let the original appear also. I have therefore corrected a copy, and made some additions. I have moreover had a map engraved, which is worth more than the book. If you chuse to print the work I will send you the corrected copy, and when it shall be nearly printed I will send the plate of the map" (TJ Papers, 11:107).

Jefferson forwarded the plate to Stockdale who added his imprint to the bottom and printed another 1,025 copies (Pritchard and Taliaferro, Degrees of Latitude, p. 307). A Map of the country between Albemarle Sound, and Lake Erie, comprehending the whole of Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and Pensylvania was compiled from various cartographic sources, chiefly maps of Virginia prepared by Jefferson's father and Joshua Fry between 1750 and 1754. In the cartouche Jefferson also credits the use of Scull's map of Pennsylvania (1770) and Thomas Hutchins's New Map of the Western Parts of Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland and North Carolina. He also employed Lewis Evans's map and John Churchman's Map of the Peninsula Between Delaware &c Chesopeak Bays for the eastern shore.

Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana, Including Cartography

|
New York