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PROPERTY FROM THE TALMOR COLLECTION

Archibald Knox
"CYMRIC" CLOCK, MODEL NO. 5431
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 22,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
161

PROPERTY FROM THE TALMOR COLLECTION

Archibald Knox
"CYMRIC" CLOCK, MODEL NO. 5431
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 22,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Design

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New York

Archibald Knox
"CYMRIC" CLOCK, MODEL NO. 5431
impressed L&Co/CYMRIC/5431 with Birmingham Assay Office marks
sterling silver, enamel, brass, clear glass faceplate
7 7/8  x 4 5/8  x 3 in. (20 x 11.7 x 7.6 cm)
1905
produced by Liberty & Co., London
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Victor and Gretha Arwas, Editions Graphiques, London
Roy and Sarita Warshawsky, Chicago, Illinois, circa 1983
Sotheby's New York, The Warshawsky Collection, May 19, 2015, lot 96
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Exhibited

Imagining an Irish Past: The Celtic Revival 1840-1940, The David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, February 6-June 16, 1992
The Liberty Style,
 Metropolitan Teien Museum of Art, Tokyo, June 12-July 25, 1999, followed by a tour to six different museums in Japan through June 2000

Literature

Liberty Silver Sketch Book, Westminster City Archives, n.d., p. 199, no. 5431
Stephen Martin, Archibald Knox, London, 1995, p. 90
The Liberty Style, exh. cat., Japan Art & Culture Association, Tokyo, 1999, p. 111, no. 163 (for the present example illustrated)
Victor Arwas, Art Nouveau from Mackintosh to Liberty: The Birth of a Style, London, 2000, p. 99
Adrian J. Tilbrook, The Designs of Archibald Knox for Liberty & Co, London, 2000, p. 142, no. 126
Victor Arwas, Art Nouveau, From Mackintosh to Liberty, the Birth of a Style, London, 2000, p. 99
Stephen A. Martin, Archibald Knox, London, 2001, p. 233 (for the present example illustrated)

This example will be published in Dr. Stephen Martin's forthcoming publication on Archibald Knox.

Catalogue Note

One of two known examples, this silver clock is an elegant example of Art Nouveau design.  In it Knox incorporates a classic element of that style in the flattened leaf and tendril motif that defines its gently curving shape.  Unlike Continental Art Nouveau, Knox here is more restrained, less dramatically linear, allowing the sheen of the silver and the richly enameled dial to help carry the design as a whole.  Adding a particularly Manx touch, Knox ‘paints’ into the dial a tetraskelion, that is a four-armed medieval design highly reminiscent of the triskellion, the national symbol of the Isle of Man.

DR. STEPHEN A. MARTIN

Important Design

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New York