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155
Frank Lloyd Wright
AN IMPORTANT TALL-BACK SPINDLE CHAIR FROM THE WARREN HICKOX HOUSE, KANKAKEE, ILLINOIS
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 150,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
155
Frank Lloyd Wright
AN IMPORTANT TALL-BACK SPINDLE CHAIR FROM THE WARREN HICKOX HOUSE, KANKAKEE, ILLINOIS
Estimate
120,000180,000
LOT SOLD. 150,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Design

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New York

Frank Lloyd Wright
AN IMPORTANT TALL-BACK SPINDLE CHAIR FROM THE WARREN HICKOX HOUSE, KANKAKEE, ILLINOIS
en suite with the following lot
oak, leather upholstery
51 1/8  x 19 x 20 in. (129.9 x 48.3 x 50.8 cm)
circa 1900
executed by John W. Ayers & Co.
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Provenance

Warren Hickox House, Kankakee, Illinois
Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Chicago, October 1987
Private Collection, Chicago
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature

William Allin Storrer, The Frank Lloyd Wright Companion, Chicago, 1993, p. 53 (for a discussion of the Warren Hickox House)
David A. Hanks, The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright, New York, 1979, pp. 201-202 (for a reference to the execution of these chairs by cabinetmaker John W. Ayers & Co., and a reference to the exhibition of the Hickox tall-back spindle chair form in the 1902 annual exhibition of the Chicago Architectural Club at the Art Institute of Chicago)
Kathryn Smith, Wright on Exhibit: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Architectural Exhibitions, Princeton, 2017, p. 10 (for a reference to the execution of these chairs by cabinetmaker John W. Ayers & Co., and a reference to the exhibition of the Hickox tall-back spindle chair form in the 1902 annual exhibition of the Chicago Architectural Club at the Art Institute of Chicago)

Catalogue Note

The present tall-back spindle chairs from the Warren Hickox House are two of only six known such chairs from the residence.  Their composition is a study in visual tension: thin spindles rise up elegantly from just above the floor and are halted by a wide oak board at the top of the backrest; the narrow slivers of positive and negative space created by the spindles impart the chair with a dynamism and liveliness that constrasts its overall austere rectilinearity.  This form was clearly a favorite of the architect, who included variations of it in several of his most important early and defining commissions, such as the Ward Willits House, which was designed at approximately the same time as the Hickox House.  Wright exhibited the present Hickox chair form in the 1902 exhibition of the Chicago Architectural Club at the Art Institute of Chicago—a clear indication of the pride Wright took in its distinct design.  Today, one other tall-back spindle chair from the Hickox House is held in the collection of the Museum of Fine Art, Boston, gifted by the American Decorative Art 1900 Foundation (accession no. 2006.1439).

Important Design

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New York