440
440

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF GEORGE AND ROSEMARY LOIS

Carlo Mollino
COFFEE TABLE, MODEL NO. 1114
Estimate
100,000150,000
LOT SOLD. 125,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
440

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF GEORGE AND ROSEMARY LOIS

Carlo Mollino
COFFEE TABLE, MODEL NO. 1114
Estimate
100,000150,000
LOT SOLD. 125,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Design

|
New York

Carlo Mollino
COFFEE TABLE, MODEL NO. 1114
each foot impressed MADE IN ITALY
glass top and shelf etched VITREX
maple, original tempered glass, brass
18 1/4  x 52 1/8  x 23 1/4  in. (46.4 x 132.4 x 59.1 cm)
circa 1950
produced by Apelli & Varesio, Turin for Singer & Sons, New York
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Richard Wright, New York
Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 2000

Literature

"Modern by Singer," Domus, no. 267, February 1952, n.p.
"Nuovi Mobili di Mollino," Domus, no. 270, May 1952, p. 50
Fulvio Ferrari, Carlo Mollino Cronaca, exh. cat., Galerie Fulvio Ferrari, Turin, 1985, p. 129
Irene de Guttry, Il Mobile Italiano Degli Anni Quaranta e Cinquanta, Rome, 1992, p. 213
Giovanni Brino, Carlo Mollino Architecure as Autobiography, London, 2005, p. 137
Rossella Colombari, Carlo Mollino: Catalogo dei Mobili - Furniture Catalogue, Milan, 2005, p. 73
Fulvio Ferrari and Napoleone Ferrari, The Furniture of Carlo Mollino, London, 2006, figs. 131 (for a period photograph of the model as advertised by Singer & Sons, 1950) and 133 (for the design drawing)
Fulvio Ferrari and Napoleone Ferrari, Carlo Mollino: Plywood, 1951, New York, 2014, figs. 11 and 18 (for period photographs of the table base model in production at the Apelli & Varesio workshop, 1952)

Catalogue Note

Carlo Mollino’s designs do not investigate aesthetics; they do not contemplate history; and above all, they do not imitate. Though Mollino acknowledged the influence of the past and the work of his contemporaries, his furniture innovations were borne purely of his own experience of the world around him.  He was a thrill-seeker—he skiied, flew planes, and raced cars.  He was a photographer, a writer, and an architect.  He was enamored with the curves and proportions of the female form. He favored functionalism but had internalized the themes of Art Nouveau, Surrealism, and Futurism. In its essence, Mollino’s work might be considered autobiographical: we can see the confluence of the many varied aspects of the artist’s life and worldview, but its most striking quality is its singularity.

Mollino did not typically design items for mass-production, but the present table is an exception. Designed in 1950 for the American furniture maker Singer & Sons, this table is exemplary of the mysterious quality that makes Mollino’s work so striking. It has a sensual quality, recalling the human figure in repose. At the same time, however, the table captures the feeling of speed, with our eyes unable to rest as they trace its dynamic, curvilinear frame. Its form is lucid, organic, controlled, and efficient, making it a masterpiece within Mollino’s oeuvre.

“Only when a work is not explainable other than in terms of itself can we say that we are in the presence of art. This ineffable quality is the hallmark of an authentic work. Whoever contemplates it receives a ‘shock’ that is unmistakable and, above all, unexplainable—a shock that he or she will try in vain to explain in rational terms. There are no reasons. If there were, we would have a way to build a convenient machine for making art through logic and grammar.” – Carlo Mollino, Architettura, spazio creato, 1953

Important Design

|
New York